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May 2015

Time June 2nd, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

Just a quick video summary of my last month abroad.

 

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Spring 2015, A Semester in Review

Time June 2nd, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

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Smile Because It Happened

Time June 2nd, 2015 in College Study Abroad | 3 Comments by

I have now officially been back in the United States for a week. Nine days, if we’re being exact. When I went to Edinburgh, I was fortunate to avoid any real culture shock or homesickness. I haven’t been quite as lucky with what they call ‘reverse culture shock.’  In situations like this, people often bring up that Dr. Seuss quote: ‘Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened,’ so I’m trying to follow his advice. I was and am glad to be home. I had missed my family and things like running on the beach, driving, and walking my dogs, and it was good to be back and just revel in the comfort and familiarity of being home. However, I am definitely having Edinburgh withdrawals and have already started planning how to get back. Because I have dual citizenship with the EU, I could potentially very easily return to Scotland to live and work for a bit. At my lowest point this week, I was looking up flats in Edinburgh. Read More »

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Revisiting the ‘Edinburgh Bucket List’

Time June 2nd, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

Towards the mid-point of the semester, I made a list of the things that I wanted to do with my remaining time in Edinburgh. Now that I’m back home in the States, I thought going back to the list would be a good way of reflecting on the latter half of my semester. Read More »

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STUDYING Abroad

Time May 28th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

Because my last final exam was yesterday, I am officially done with my semester at the University of Edinburgh, and now seems like a good time to reflect on what it was like go to the university here. Though studying abroad offers countless opportunities to explore a new city and culture, it also necessarily involves actually studying and attending class. As one of the top ten universities in the world, Edinburgh is fairly academically rigorous, a fact that was slightly exacerbated by the differences in the academic system. Read More »

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36 Hours in Dublin

Time May 28th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

For our last official adventure abroad, Morgan, Karen, and I decided to head to Dublin for the weekend. We didn’t want to leave the British Isles without seeing some part of Ireland, and Dublin seemed like a good place to start. So we hopped on a plane with only a very vague idea of what we wanted to see and do. Read More »

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The Miraculous Gift

Time May 26th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

As some of you may or may not know, my favorite television show of all time is The Office (US). It was one of the first ‘grown-up’ shows that I got really invested in, and at this point I’ve been watching and rewatching episodes for eight years. Which it’s why it’s fitting that upon trying to reflect about this amazing semester, one of the first things that popped into my head was a quote from the series finale: ‘No matter how you get there or where you end up, human beings have this miraculous gift to make that place home.’ Though Creed makes this claim as he’s being arrested and taken to prison, it still holds a great deal of relevance and profundity. Over the past five months, Edinburgh hasn’t just become my home away from home; it’s just home. For whatever reason, I have come to feel like I belong in this magical, eclectic, breathtaking city. I’ve gotten to know the streets of Auld Reekie almost as well as those of Mattapoisett or Providence, and I’ve found a kind of family in the friends I’ve made here. Even ordinary days were able to feel somehow extraordinary – I wasn’t just walking to class, I was walking to class through the streets of Edinburgh, the same streets where figures ranging from David Hume to JK Rowling roamed. My flat was in the shadow of a dormant volcano. I played trivia in a building older than the United States. I am so incredibly grateful that I had the opportunity and ability to come to Edinburgh and live here for five months, truly making this place a home. It has been one of, if not the, best experience(s) of my life, and I cannot wait to come back.

  screen-shot-2015-05-23-at-12-37-51-am My last Edinburgh sunset

 

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Document Your Life || April 2015

Time May 11th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

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Isle of Skye Weekend

Time May 11th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

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Spring Break Part III: Amsterdam

Time May 11th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

Amsterdam is one of those places that I’ve wanted to visit for years. All three of us (us being Morgan, Karen, and myself) went into this part of our trip with a pretty good idea of what we wanted to do and see. We landed in the afternoon, and after buying an overpriced bus ticket, we got to the Van Gogh Hostel, a hostel/hotel near Museumplein, which, you guessed it, is where the major museums in Amsterdam are located. As always, the first order of business was getting oriented and then hunting down food of some kind. We took the map the receptionist had given us and headed out with no real plans, ending up at a pizza place near Leidseplein. The rest of the evening was spent simply wandering and taking in the city. Amsterdam was kind of exactly how I pictured it with its breathtaking canals and cobblestone streets. However there were way more bikes than I could’ve imagined. Like there was an overwhelming number of them. I knew it was a biking city but there were significantly more bikes than any other kind of transportation. We then had another early night, going back to the hostel to get some rest before an early start the next day. Read More »

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And the Tourist Becomes the Tour Guide

Time May 11th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

After four months abroad, I still wasn’t homesick, but I did genuinely miss my family. Fortunately, they were able to take my semester in Edinburgh as an excuse to arrange a European adventure of their own. While I was in Skye, they were in Paris, and then London. The day after I returned from Skye, I hopped on a train to meet them in the English capital. My parents met me at the train station and after hugs, we went to their hotel to change and get ready for dinner at Jamie Oliver’s restaurant in Covent Gardens. Dinner was followed by gelato and then it was back to the hotel to catch some sleep. Read More »

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Spring Break Part II: Prague

Time May 11th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

Morgan, Karen, and I had three days to spend in Prague. It was my second time in the capital of the Czech Republic, as I went with my family five years ago. As previously noted, we stayed in an AirBnB flat a ten minute metro ride from the center of the city. It was my first time using AirBnB, and it was an incredibly positive experience. Since we split the cost of the flat between the three of us, it came to about $10/night for a really nice space to come home to at the end of a long day of being tourists. Because the flat came with a kitchen, we were also able to save money by preparing our own meals when necessary. Our first night, the primary concern was finding a quick and cheap dinner, so we went to the food court at the shopping centre across the street and grabbed some Thai. We then spent the rest of the night planning out the next three days. Read More »

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Spring Break Part I: Germany

Time May 11th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

One of the many differences between the University of Edinburgh and most universities in the States is that Edinburgh has a significantly shorter semester. The last day of classes was April 3, so my friends and I took the opportunity to travel as much as possible during the month-long break until exams. Read More »

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March Recap

Time April 27th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

 

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10 Hours in Glasgow

Time April 6th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

Two weeks ago, Karen, Morgan, and I spent the day in Glasgow. It’s actually quite cheap and easy to get to – the ride is about 90 minutes, and a round trip ticket only costs about £5.50. The bus arrived in Glasgow at approximately 10:30 AM, and the tone of the day was set when, on our way to find some breakfast, we walked by a man who opened his front door and exclaimed, ‘Oh, what a beautiful day in Glasgow!” We stopped at a Pret A Manger to grab some coffee and consult the guidebooks, mapping out the next few hours. After breakfast, our first two stops were The Willow Tea Rooms and the Glasgow School of Art, both of which turned out to be vaguely disappointing, or at least less exciting than we had come to believe. Willow Tea Rooms, though designed by the famed architect, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, was just an actual tea room, when we had assumed it was some kind of museum. The school of art, while also impressive on the outside, was not open to the public unless you paid to join an hour-long tour.

From there, we regrouped and hopped on the subway to go to Kelvingrove. The Glasgow subway system is fantastic. It’s literally just one circle, so even if you do somehow get on the wrong train, you’ll eventually end up where you need to go. Before heading to the museum, we walked through the University of Glasgow campus for a wee bit and took a detour through a park. It was absolutely gorgeous weather, and we were feeling great. The Kelvingrove Museum was also really impressive. It didn’t seem to be organized in any specific way, at least to an untrained eye, and had everything from great works of art to history to natural science. It was absolutely worth the trip and while the museum had a lot to offer, it wasn’t unmanageably huge, so we were able to see most of it in about two hours.

After Kelvingrove, we made our way towards St. Mungo’s Cathedral, a stunning building which, according to the guidebook, provides visitors with a “vague Gothic thrill.” Unfortunately, by the time we got to the cathedral, it was closed, so we just admired it from the outside. We then walked back toward the city center to find dinner (we ended up eating at Rumours, a great Malaysian restaurant) and catch the 8PM bus back to Edinburgh.

Though I thoroughly enjoyed Glasgow, I am glad that I chose Edinburgh as my study abroad destination. Glasgow is much larger than Edinburgh and has a significantly more city/industrial feel to it. Unlike Edinburgh, where you can walk pretty much anywhere in less than 30 minutes and streets and buildings are all distinct, Glasgow was kind of difficult and disorienting to navigate. I would absolutely go back and the city has a ton to offer, but the trip also confirmed that Edinburgh is the place for me.

 

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Time Flies

Time March 24th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | 7 Comments by

Today I officially only have two months left in Edinburgh. It’s a distressing realization, as I have come to completely fall in love with the city. I know it’s a cliché to say that your time studying abroad has been the best experience of your life, but in this case, it’s true. In this short period, I feel like I’ve grown and changed in ways I could never have anticipated and seen and done so many amazing things. I have made lifelong friends, tried new things, and found a place where I feel completely comfortable to the point that I’ve been fortunate enough to avoid homesickness entirely. Honestly, I’ve already spent a lot of time regretting that I chose to only spend one semester here and if I could do it over, I’d even consider coming to the university for the entirety of my college education. Since that isn’t possible, I’m trying to make the most of every single moment I have left. In that spirit, here’s an Edinburgh bucket list of sorts:

 

Climb Arthur’s Seat – if I leave the city without doing this, I will be incredibly disappointed with myself. How often do you get the chance to climb a dormant volcano in the middle of your new favorite city? It’s a must-do according to everyone who’s ever done it, and it offers stunning views.

Have a picnic in the Meadows – this one is reserved for when the weather eventually gets a bit warmer, but spending an afternoon in this beautiful park would be grand.

Go to a show or gig – though I have gone to a gig whilst in Edinburgh, I’d love to go to another. Glasgow is the music-oriented city, but Edinburgh also has a lot to offer and it’d be a shame if I didn’t take advantage of it. My friends and I also really want to go see The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime at the Festival Theater.

Spend the day in Leith – though Leith is technically part of Edinburgh, residents of both areas largely consider it a separate entity. It’s located directly on the coast of the Firth of Forth and would be a lovely place to spend the day as the weather continues to improve.

Go to the National Gallery – thankfully my friend Steph and I are going this week, but as both a student in Visualising Scotland and a tourist, a visit is a must.

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Scotland Is Out of This World

Time March 24th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

This past week, Scotland experienced both the Aurora Borealis and a solar eclipse. I was fortunate enough to be able to witness both. Or at least attempt to witness both. On Tuesday, I was informed that the Aurora Borealis would be active over the U.K., so that evening I trekked up Calton Hill to attempt to spot it. I spent about two hours trying to see some sign that the Northern Lights were active, but unfortunately Edinburgh was too cloudy and foggy. Other areas, both within the U.K. and outside it were a bit more fortunate, so I was able to browse through pictures online afterwards to see what I had missed. Even though I was unsuccessful, it was a really cool way to spend an evening. It’s not every day you even get the chance to try to spot such an incredible natural phenomenon. Someday I’ll go about trying to see the Northern Lights more officially, but it was one of those times where I was able to be spontaneous and do something out of the ordinary.

View from Calton Hill at night

View from Calton Hill at night

 

Then on Friday morning, we experienced a solar eclipse. Though I was in seminar at the time, our tutor allowed us to have a conveniently timed tea break and go watch it through the window. If you look directly at the solar eclipse, you will severely damage your eyes, but we were able to see it by looking at its reflection in a puddle. It was my first time seeing an eclipse of any kind, and it was awesome and just another kind of unexpected addition to my time abroad. Even the New York Times published articles and videos covering the event. According to an article by Dan Bilefsky and Melissa Eddy entitled ‘Europeans (Carefully) Gaze Upward for Glimpse of the Solar Eclipse,’ “solar eclipses are unusual marvels, occurring intermittently and visible only in certain parts of the planet” and in Europe, “the next total solar eclipse will not occur until 2026.” So while not a once-in-a-lifetime event, it was definitely something pretty rare. The article also noted that a lot of people were disappointed with the eclipse, or thought that it didn’t live up to the hype that was generated about it. Maybe it’s because it was my first time witnessing this event, but I found this surprising. It definitely wasn’t as dramatic as some may have claimed it would, but it was still pretty amazing. You can see and decide for yourself by watching this video on the NY Times site, which shows the eclipse as it occurred over Norway: http://www.nytimes.com/video/science/100000003583902/solar-eclipse-videos-across-the-globe.html

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Argyll Adventure Weekend (Alternatively Titled “Pop, Loch, and Drop It”)

Time March 24th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

One of the many benefits of studying abroad through IFSA-Butler is the fact that the program includes two trips, the first of which was an adventure weekend at the Benmore Centre in Argyll. Every student had the chance to sign up for and participate in two activities – I chose hiking and canoeing, but other options included things like gorge scrambling, underground caving, and mountain biking.

We departed Edinburgh at 2:30 PM on Friday and, after a relatively quick drive and ferry ride, we arrived at the Benmore Centre and were assigned rooms and served a lovely dinner of fish and chips, with both gluten free and vegetarian options available for those who needed it. After dinner, we had the choice between going on a night hike or staying in and watching Rob Roy, a film where Liam Neeson is a Highland clan leader. My friends and I chose to stay in due to exhaustion and a general aversion to trust-building activities, but those who did go on the hike seemed to have an amazing time.

The next day we woke up bright and early and had breakfast before splitting into our activity groups. It poured rain the entire weekend, but that didn’t stop anyone. My group and I started the day by hiking to Puck’s Glenn, a breathtaking trek full of amazing scenery and waterfalls. After a quick break for lunch back at the center, we headed out for an afternoon of canoeing on Loch Eck. By the time everyone returned to the center, we were all soaked and exhausted, so most people took the chance to shower, change, and rest before dinner and a screening of Braveheart. It was my first time watching the film, which is essentially a three-hour long, historically inaccurate Mel Gibson vanity project, but somehow still managed to be vaguely entertaining and the perfect way to end the weekend.

On Sunday morning we left around 10 AM to go back to Edinburgh, making a quick detour to Loch Lomond for a photo-op. Despite the inclement weather, it was a perfect weekend and I can’t wait for the IFSA-Butler trip to the Isle of Skye in April.

 

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The Benmore Centre

 

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

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What I Learned During Innovative Learning Week

Time March 24th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

One of the many things that makes the University of Edinburgh so great and unique is that during week six of the second semester, lectures and seminars are suspended in favor of innovative learning. The university hosts a myriad of events, ranging from workshops to create a magazine in 24 hours to discussions about the science of the paranormal. Unfortunately, my innovative learning week did not include any of the events sponsored by the university. However, I do feel like I learned a few things on my week off.

 

  1. Avoid London rush hour on the tube at all costs.

I kicked off the week by heading to London to visit my friend Tatiana. Despite the fact that London really isn’t that far from Edinburgh (it’s just a 4-5 hour train ride), it was my first time to the city. Tickets can be expensive, but the 16-25 Student Rail Card gives you a 1/3 discount and cuts costs considerably. It’s definitely worth the £30 investment. My train left Edinburgh on Friday afternoon and pulled into King’s Cross around 5:30 PM, just as people were leaving work and rushing home. As someone who was tired and slightly overwhelmed, it was a great exercise in controlling anxiety. I navigated the tube (which, by the way, is my new favorite subway system – it’s relatively clean and organized, and quite easy to navigate, even as someone without a ton of experience riding public transport) and found my way to Tatiana’s flat.

 

  1. It can be really nice to explore a new city on your own.

Saturday I had the opportunity to wander around London on my own. I began by hopping on the tube from West London, where I was staying, into the city center, getting off at Westminster. From there I pretty much wandered aimlessly. I didn’t have a map, so I kind of had to follow my instinct when there were no publically displayed maps. This method actually worked pretty well, and I managed to take in the majority of the touristy places in eight hours. I moved from Westminster to Trafalgar Square, stopped in the National Gallery, and walked a loop around the Thames to see Big Ben, the London Eye, the Globe Theater, the Tate Modern, and the gorgeous views from the various bridges. There were times where I got lost, but because I was operating on my own time, it wasn’t really stressful, and because of the few accidental detours I took, I was able to do things like stumble upon a used book sale or see areas of the city that I otherwise would’ve missed.

 

  1. But it can be equally great to see the city with a friend, especially one who lives there.

On Sunday, Tatiana took me around London. We began by taking the tube to Paddington and walking through Little Venice, an absolutely stunning canal full of houseboats. Then we made our way to Primrose Hill for a photo-op and to take in the gorgeous London landscape. Afterwards, we went to Camden Market and eventually ended up back in the center, where we walked to Buckingham Palace and wandered along the banks of the Thames. One of the reasons I liked London so much is because it’s such an eclectic city. Every area feels distinct, but they all somehow connect and fit together to form one phenomenal metropolis. It’s a big city – certainly much bigger than Edinburgh – but it wasn’t overwhelming. Though I did and saw a lot during my short time there, I definitely didn’t do the city justice and fortunately I get to return in April with my family when they come visit.

 

  1. Sometimes plans are made to be broken.

Though I didn’t end up participating in any official Innovative Learning Week events, my friends and I had every intention of doing so and had reserved places to do the Race Against Time, an event where you race around the city to complete tasks and “see the city in a new light for inexhaustible wellbeing.” In the end, we abandoned those plans and had a better day than I could’ve imagined. We began our afternoon by going to Piemakers for lunch, where I had a macaroni and cheese pie. So good – I highly recommend it if you’re ever in Edinburgh. From there we went on our own walk around the city, venturing into closes and putting our knowledge of Edinburgh’s winding and overlapping streets to the test. It’s really cool to feel yourself gradually getting to know a place. At this point, Edinburgh truly is my second home and I vaguely feel like I belong here.

 

  1. Never underestimate the power of the hairy coo.

Morgan, Karen, and I spent Thursday innovatively learning about the Highlands. The Hairy Coo is a touring company that provides free (pay what you are able to and according to your perception of the value of the day) bus tours of the Highlands. Don, our tour guide, was funny, knowledgeable, and very Scottish. Highlights of the tour included a stops at Stirling Castle and Doune Castle (immortalized by Monty Python and the Holy Grail), a walk around Loch Katrine, and, most importantly, seeing hairy coos, or Highland cows. They are, without contest, the cutest animal I’ve seen in Scotland and, with the exception of my own dogs, possibly ever. However, as Don warned, they are very territorial and it’s not advised to get too close, as their big horns can cause damage to your person.

 

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February: A Month in Review

Time March 17th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

So I’d like to begin by apologizing for being completely AWOL for the past month. I have a bunch of posts in the work, but in the meantime hopefully this brief video summary of February will help catch you up:

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There’s No Place Like Home(stay)

Time February 10th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

I’m a bit behind on blog posts, but last weekend was my homestay, a mandatory part of the IFSA-Butler program where you go and live with a family outside of Edinburgh for a weekend. My homestay took me to Penrith, England, a small town in the breathtakingly beautiful Lake District.

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January, A Month in Review

Time February 2nd, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

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Burns Night (Among Other Things)

Time January 26th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

The past seven days have been quite uneventful, and it’s really been the first week that I’m fully settled in and completely in a routine. Though last week was the first week of classes, it was still part of that getting oriented with the university and figuring out what my time in Edinburgh will look like on a normal basis. This was the first week I experienced my normal life in Edinburgh. It really just involves classes and studying, trips to the grocery store, laundry (for some reason I had been putting off doing laundry until today but it’s exactly the same as doing laundry in the U.S.), exploring, and going on outings with friends. I finally set up my Scottish bank account to avoid international fees every time I need to withdraw money, I hunted down more books, I got coffee from the cart outside one of my classes, I cleaned my room, I met with my autonomous learning groups – all really mundane stuff, but it feels oddly good to be doing it. I’m getting to the point where I feel like I belong here; I’m just constantly incredibly content and I’ve started half-joking to my parents that I’m never leaving (I mean my visa expires after 6 months so I don’t really have a choice). And when I do go back home, I can already tell that I’m going to be the obnoxious stereotypical returned study abroad student who never stops talking about their time oversees. Of course there are moments when I’m homesick or anxious, but they seem secondary to the experience that is studying abroad in Edinburgh.

I also did a few vaguely more exciting things this week. Friday, Morgan, Karen, and I went to Mums, a restaurant near Potterrow, for dinner and had the traditional British meal of bangers (sausages – though mine were vegetarian sausages, which I understand is slightly paradoxical) and mash (mashed potatoes). The combination of the delicious food and the great company made it seem almost like a home-cooked meal, which is one thing I have kind of been missing. After dinner, we hit up Sainsbury’s for alcoholic beverages (namely Tennent’s and Strongbow) and Scottish candy and then watched Mulan together, which is actually kind of my ideal night. So it was a great Friday.

On Saturday we met up again and got breakfast at Elephants and Bagels before heading over to the university to do some work. Though I was less academically productive than I had hoped, the three of us did start talking about and planning trips we want to take, particularly over spring break. One of the reasons I chose to study abroad in Europe is the opportunity for travel within the continent, so during spring break I hope to take advantage of that. My problem is that I want to go everywhere and see everything, but that also means that I’ll be happy no matter where I end up visiting. I’d also love to do shorter excursions, like day trips to Glasgow and weekend trips to places like London and Dublin. I still haven’t climbed Arthur’s Seat, I’d love to go to a rugby or football match, there’s an endless list of places I’d still like to go to within Edinburgh itself, and I still have to be able to actually get all my academic work taken care of. Though six months may sound like a long time, it’s already starting to fly by and it’s going to have to be jam-packed with activities and adventures in order to fit everything in, but I’m looking forward to every second of it.

Saturday evening, my flatmates threw a Burns Night celebration. For those of you who don’t know, Robert Burns is an 18th century poet (the national poet of Scotland) who’s loved and celebrated by the Scottish people. You might know him for the poem/song “Auld Lang Syne.” People celebrate his birthday (January 25) every year, mostly by having haggis, neeps, and tatties and reciting his “Address to a Haggis.” My flatmates and I (but mostly my flatmates) made dinner for the five of us and a few other friends who joined. It was just an all-around lovely evening.

Today I mostly just cleaned and did some reading for class, but I ended the day by going to Teviot for pub night with Karen and Morgan. It was our chance to redeem ourselves as Let’s Get Down to Quizness, and we did actually improve from last week. Instead of being in last place, we were in second-to-last place. So progress. We got dinner and drinks and tried to remember things like the capital of Greenland (Nuuk) and who hosted the first FIFA World Cup (Uruguay). It really is one of the best ways to end the weekend.

This coming week is once again fairly straightforward, but next weekend I will be in Shap, England for my IFSA-Butler homestay, which I will be sure to carefully document. Next week, I’ll also be uploading a video summary of my first month in Edinburgh. It’s not quite a vlog; it’s more of a collection of clips from the month of January and a version of the Document Your Life Project. Until then, have a great week!

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Friday I’m in Love, Saturday I’m in St. Andrews

Time January 20th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

As the title of this post suggests, this week I will be discussing an event I went to called “Friday, I’m in Love,” as well as my day trip to St. Andrews on Saturday. But first I need to address the following topics and questions:

  1. The Scottish class system (as in the academic/university class system – I won’t be discussing the bourgeoisie, at least not this week)
  2. How many times can the weather change in a 30-minute period?
  3. How many potatoes can/should one consume in a week? (Spoiler alert: the limit does not exist. But also it kind of does?)
  4. If your team’s name doesn’t involve a pun of some kind, are you really fully participating in pub quiz night?

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Edinburgh is Edinbreathtaking

Time January 12th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Scotland | No Comments by

It’s hard to believe I’ve already been in Edinburgh for a week. But it also strangely feels like I’ve been forever. I have completely fallen in love with this eclectic city in the past seven days and I honestly don’t think that six months will be nearly enough time. A lot has already happened in this first week, but I’ll do my best to summarize.

Sunday (January 4, 2015)

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