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England Study Abroad Program at St Anne's College

About England in Oxford, England

  • Required GPA:3.7 (4.0 scale)
  • Application deadlines: January 15 for full year (Sept-June)
    January 15 for all pre-med terms
    We recommend early application to St. Anne's College, as admission is competitive and spaces are limited. However, we are sometimes able to place students after the application deadline. Please contact our St. Anne's College program advisor to discuss available options.
  • Program advisor: Emma Diebold
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Program Snapshot

st-annes

We're so excited that you're preparing to study abroad on an IFSA-Butler program and have chosen St. Anne's College, University of Oxford for your year abroad. St. Anne's is known for its relaxed, down-to-earth atmosphere that complements the serious pursuit of scholarship. We're sure you're going to love studying there!

What St. Anne's has to offer

  • The first college at Oxford to be created especially for female students, today it's home to an almost equal number of men and women
  • A commitment to academics that shows in the college library of 100,000 volumes, one of the two largest undergraduate libraries in Oxford
  • Located off the beaten path in Oxford, about a 10-minute walk from the old city
  • A workout gym, photography darkroom, games room and 24-hour computer lab
  • Shared fields and facilities for rugby, field hockey, cricket, soccer, squash, tennis and boating

Housing

  • Students live in college with other St. Anne's students
  • Students prepare their own meals or eat in the college dining hall on a pay-as-you-go basis

Academics

  • Extremely competitive admission
  • Students receive individual guidance from their tutor and benefit from the tutor's expert knowledge
  • Unique tutorial instruction allows students to work independently and develop their own academic ideas
  • Students take one primary tutorial and one secondary tutorial per term

We look forward to working with you!





Academics


Academic Structure

How is the University of Oxford structured?
The University of Oxford is a federation of 44 autonomous colleges and halls that have separate grounds, their own tutors and administrators, and distinct personalities. The colleges organize admission, accommodation and tutorial instruction for students. College tutors and administrators have their offices in the college as well. Seminar and lecture halls and a library are located in each college for academic purposes. The colleges are also responsible for providing sports and social facilities. Not only do students live, study, socialize and dine at their college, but they may also take their tutorials in their college. As a result, students often have a stronger allegiance to their college than to the university.

The university determines the general content of each discipline, organizes lectures, regulates degree exams and provides excellent resources like the Bodleian Library, faculty (departmental) libraries, laboratories, museums, computing facilities and more.

Students are members of both their college and the university. Compared with U.S. institutions, each of the member colleges is quite small, few having more than 500 students. The combined full-time enrollment of undergraduate and graduate students at Oxford is about 20,000 men and women who are among the brightest, most motivated students the world has to offer.

What does St. Anne's look for in potential candidates?
St. Anne's faculty members who review applications are primarily interested in the following:

  • A student's overall academic background and academic statement.
  • Achievements in the student's major area(s) of study. All Oxford colleges prefer students who have taken three to five courses in their tutorial field prior to the term they are studying abroad.
  • The tutorials requested by the student.
  • Writing samples-These show off your writing style and background in your subject(s) of study.

Who are the tutors?
Most Visiting Students are instructed by tutors from their specific University of Oxford college, but sometimes by tutors from other colleges. The main criterion is that students should have the most appropriate tutors for their own particular interests and needs. Visiting Students may be taught by Fellows, lecturers or advanced graduate students.

During their period of study at St. Anne's, Visiting Students will be under the general supervision of the Tutor for Visiting Students, a Fellow of the college who is appointed to oversee the program. In addition to coordinating the study program, the advisor will be available for consultation on both academic and personal matters.

How does the tutorial system work?
The tutorial system is at the heart of Oxford's approach to university education. While most universities in the U.S. and the U.K. rely on lectures, classes and seminars as their main mode of teaching, Oxford places the emphasis on tutorials. Other methods are used, but they are secondary to tutorials.

Oxford's tutorial system consists of an hour in-depth discussion between one student or a pair of students and a tutor assigned by the college. Tutorials that take place once a week are called the primary or major tutorial, and tutorials that take place once every other week are called a secondary or minor tutorial. Visiting Students take one primary and one secondary tutorial per term.

At the center of each tutorial is an essay that a student researches and prepares in the week prior to the meeting. In the traditional tutorial, students will read the essay aloud to the tutor, although today many tutors might ask to take the essay home with them or will request the essay early in order to read it prior to the meeting. Discussion of the essay will often lead to further conversation of the topic at hand or a related topic.

Tutorial meeting times are traditionally arranged between the tutor and the student upon arrival. Tutorials can also be held in a variety of locations: a college room, university building or even in the tutor's own home.

How do I prepare for a tutorial?
In researching and writing the assigned essay, students consult a list of books, journals and/or research materials they have received from the tutor and also explore related materials. In this way students bring to the essay and the subsequent discussion a variety of information, which will also stimulate their thinking on the subject. This is a highly individualized method of learning, and tutorials can often be tailored to the student. Keep this in mind when discussing the subject for the next tutorial.

Preparing for a tutorial is much different than studying for a class or a test. It requires independence, self-discipline and self-motivation. The great advantage of the tutorial is that for an entire hour, a student has the undivided attention of an expert in the subject at hand. However, be prepared for the fact that Visiting Students, like degree students at Oxford, must become accustomed to self-directed study and working independently. Tutors will not simply offer facts and information because they will expect students to present their own thoughts and ideas!

When will I know if I've been accepted?
Your program advisor will contact you via phone and/or e-mail when you've been accepted by St. Anne's College. Acceptance decisions generally take about 6-8 weeks once your application is complete and sent overseas.

Will I be fully integrated into the Oxford Community?
Yes. All IFSA-Butler students studying at Oxford are awarded Visiting Student status, as opposed to the more restrictive Associate Student status. Visiting Students are considered to be full members of the college and have access to all University facilities, libraries, societies and sports teams with the exception of the University rowing team. Visiting Students are also full members of their college's Junior Common Room (JCR) and enjoy full college privileges, including college-owned accommodation with other undergraduates of their college.

Most importantly, Visiting Students are taught in the same manner and assessed by the same standards as other degree-seeking undergraduates at Oxford. Tutors expect the same quality of work from Visiting Students as they do from degree-seeking undergraduates. Visiting Students are considered alumni upon successful completion of their term or year abroad.




Tutorials

Where can I find a list of subjects and/or tutorials that the university offers?
Because of the individualized nature of the tutorial system, colleges at Oxford do not have an online course catalog. However, St. Anne's has a page with a list of possible tutorial subjects. Click here to visit the page. All tutorials are subject to availability of tutors.

Are there any tips for completing the tutorial request form?
Yes! Following are some of the things you should keep in mind as you complete the tutorial request form.

  • The tutorials you choose should build on knowledge you have already acquired at your home university. Do not request introductory-level or survey tutorials. You should not plan to fulfill elective requirements while studying at Oxford. Stick to tutorials in your major or another discipline where you have already taken at least two classes.
  • Your tutorial topics should be limited to no more than two subjects, and those subjects should be related. For instance, the tutors reviewing your application will look more favorably at a tutorial request form that has choices limited to politics and history departments. They would not be as impressed with a tutorial request form that lists choices in chemistry, economics and art history.
  • We recommend that you complete the form by requesting all of your top-choice tutorials first. Then, after you've completed your top choices, go back through and add your second choices. Occasionally, St. Anne's may accept a student based on some of their second choices, so make sure you like all of the tutorials you list.
  • It is difficult to change your tutorial choices once you've made them, so make sure you are comfortable with your choices. Tuition is organized specifically for you and once St. Anne's confirms your choices, your tutors will be expecting you and will have committed their time to you.


What if I need to take a required course?
Please be aware that IFSA-Butler cannot guarantee that your host university will offer a particular course, or that you will be allowed to take that particular course. However, if you need to take a required course, you may indicate that it is required on your tutorial preference form. Your IFSA-Butler program advisor will communicate your needs to your host university.

Course Restrictions

Your tutorial topics should be limited to no more than two subjects, and those subjects should be related. For instance, the tutors reviewing your application will look more favorably at a tutorial request form that has choices limited to politics and history departments. They would not be as impressed with a tutorial request form that lists choices in chemistry, economics and art history.

Credits

How many tutorials am I able to take, and how do I determine U.S. semester credit hours?
Students take one primary (major) and one secondary (minor) tutorial every term. Students are not permitted to receive extra credit by taking two primary tutorials in one term. Butler University will award students 8 U.S. semester credit hours for each primary tutorial and 4 U.S. semester credit hours for each secondary tutorial. No credit will be awarded for additional work undertaken even if the Oxford College approves it.

Butler University will issue 24 U.S. semester credit hours for the Hilary/Trinity (spring) two-term program and 36 U.S. semester credit hours for the academic year at Oxford.

Science and math students may be required to attend University lectures or to take one or more short tutorials. Regardless of the number of tutorials or lectures required, science students will earn the same number of credits (12 U.S. semester credit hours per term) as other students.

Registration

What are the registration conditions?
You must take a full University of Oxford course load as determined by IFSA-Butler. Credit will be awarded on a Butler University transcript based on a typical U.S. full course load. All courses are graded on an A-F scale, and there is no provision for pass/fail or auditing courses unless pass/fail is the only method of assessment for the course. You are not allowed to register for online, distance education or hybrid courses.

You should also be aware that you may be charged additional fees by your home institution or host university to take or process additional credits. Taking less than a full course load may jeopardize your student status and result in personal academic repercussions and/or loss of financial aid.

The tutorial preference form is not a registration form; it is a guideline to let your host college know which subjects you are interested in taking abroad. You should discuss your tutorial selections with your academic advisor at your home institution. Completing the tutorial request form is one of the most important things you will do as you prepare to study abroad. Your admissions decision will be partially based upon your tutorial preferences, so please do not plan to deviate from your initial choices.

Exams

What do I need to know about exams?
Because of the differences in the academic systems, most students will not take exams at the University of Oxford. However, you will need to complete and submit all academic work prior to departing the program. Please refer to your program calendar to review the program dates.

Transcripts

How will my home university know what my tutorials were and what grades I received?
After you have returned to the U.S., your home university will receive a Butler University transcript with the credit you earned at the University of Oxford. The Butler University transcript will report the equivalent U.S. semester credit hours and letter grades. We also will send an official transcript to your permanent address. After you receive your Butler University transcript, both you and your home school advisor will also receive copies of your tutorial reports containing helpful feedback from your tutors.

Housing

Housing Options

What are my housing options?
Visiting Students will live in housing provided by St. Anne's College during academic terms. Students live in college (on-site dormitory housing) with other St. Anne's undergraduates.

The dormitories are divided into a traditional Oxford residence format known as staircases. Each staircase houses roughly 20 students over three floors. The staircases at St. Anne's can range from Victorian times style to modern buildings. Most staircases have a shared bathroom, while some have en-suite rooms, meaning you would have your own bathroom. All rooms are singles with a twin bed, desk, and wardrobe (closet). Bed linens are provided.

If you have special needs or requests for housing you should make a note of it on your housing preference form. St. Anne's is well equipped to handle requests made by students with disabilities.


Meals

Housing is self catering, providing basic cooking facilities (microwave, refrigerator, and stovetop) to prepare your own meals. There are no meal plan options at St. Anne's, but students do have the option of eating in the dining hall on a pay-as-you-go basis. You will receive further information about meals at your Oxford orientation.

Housing FAQs

Is my housing included in the program fee?
Yes. Your program fee includes accommodation at the university while classes are in session. You will be responsible for the cost of your meals (whether a meal plan or self-catered) and any commuting costs you may incur. Students are required to move out of their rooms during winter and spring breaks. If you wish to remain in residence during the vacation period(s), you must notify the college housing office upon arrival to make necessary arrangements. Staying in residence during the university breaks may incur additional costs not covered by the IFSA-Butler program fee.

When will I receive my housing assignment?
Although you will be housed in St. Anne's housing, you will not receive your official address until you arrive in England for orientation.

Please keep in mind that while IFSA-Butler guarantees housing, we cannot guarantee your preferences.

Do I have to pay a housing deposit?

Yes. IFSA-Butler requires a refundable housing deposit of $300 before going abroad. We will return this deposit to you after September 1 for spring and year programs, less any fines, damages or outstanding debts in your name.

Can I arrange my own housing?

Yes. IFSA-Butler recognizes that some students require independent housing for their time abroad. If you choose not to take advantage of our guaranteed housing, you may sign up for independent housing on the housing preference form. Once you've made this choice, we will not provide housing for you or bill you for the accommodation fee.

Please be advised that housing costs can be high abroad, and many times students living independently end up spending more money than students living in IFSA-Butler arranged housing. If you are hoping to save money by arranging housing on your own, please research your options early so you can compare costs. You must notify us of your intention to live in independent housing by the program application deadline for your term abroad, listed at the top of this page. We are not able to accommodate independent housing requests after the deadline.

If you choose independent housing, the Oxford Accommodation Office may be able to help you.

Location Info

Living and Studying Abroad in Oxford, England

About Oxford
Population: 170,000
Location:Oxfordshire, in south central England

City features

  • Bustling, modern city anchored by an air of academic tradition
  • A diverse population and an urban edge
  • Incredible architecture, from medieval to Victorian to modern
  • Museums, theatres, cinemas, concert halls, drama clubs, debating societies, river sports and a wealth of entertainment resources.
  • In addition to many cultural events at the colleges, the city offers plenty of pubs and bars for nightlife

Do more!

  • Participate in Oxford traditions such as punting (boating) on the River Isis (Thames) and Cherwell and caroling from the Magdalen church tower on May Day
  • Take day trips to the beautiful Cotswolds, Warwick Castle, Blenheim Palace and Stratford-upon-Avon, home to William Shakespeare
  • Catch a bus or train London, about an hour away

Links
Oxford University
Oxfordshire Link
Cotswolds Tourism
Stratford-upon-Avon
Warwick Castle
This is Oxfordshire

Dates & Fees

Program Dates

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Important: Once you are abroad, please verify the program end date with the department(s) in which you are studying. Ending dates may vary from department to department, and you will be expected to complete all course obligations prior to your departure. Program housing is available only until the program end date.

Your program end date may change due to circumstances beyond IFSA-Butler's control. Upon arrival at your host university, be sure to verify your exam schedule and program end date. We also strongly recommend that you investigate fees and penalties associated with your airline tickets in case you need to make date or route changes.

In the United Kingdom, exams are taken under formal conditions and changes cannot be made for individuals. Exams must be taken where and when scheduled.

Program Fees

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What's included in our England program fees
Expense calculator

Academic Year Payments Due: July 1
Spring Payment Due:
November 15

Program Fee Bills
IFSA-Butler will send a single bill for tuition, services and housing. Any bills for tuition differentials and/or supplemental housing fees will be sent separately. Students who opt for independent housing will not be charged the housing component of the program fee.

Housing
The housing component of our program fee is based on the average cost of local student self-catering accommodation, usually a shared room in a regular dormitory, apartment or house without any extra features.

† Housing Deposit
This program requires a housing deposit of $300. This payment is in addition to the program fee but is due on the same date. The deposit is held separately from the program fee and should be paid separately. The deposit is refunded to the student after the program, less any damages, fines or outstanding debts in the student’s name.

Personal Cost Estimates

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Expense calculator

These figures are designed to assist students with financial planning but are only estimates based on past students’ experiences at the current exchange rate. They do not include any entertainment or vacation travel costs. Meals are estimated based on the cost of a weekly standard grocery shop with one or two meals out.  If you plan to eat out once a day or more, we recommend using a higher estimate.  If you have dietary restrictions or follow a specific diet (gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan, organic, etc), you may also wish to budget more due to the higher cost of specialty food items.

The above numbers are general estimates of expenses during a program abroad. We recommend taking into account your current spending habits, the cost of living in your host country and the current exchange rate. Your IFSA-Butler program advisor can be helpful as you attempt to work on a personal budget for your experience abroad.

Personal Miscellaneous: Covers general expenses of college life, including course supplies, photocopying, toiletries, snacks, personal care, etc.

All costs are in U.S. dollars.

Meet Your IFSA-Butler Team

IFSA-Butler has a dedicated team of staff who are here to help students prepare for their program in England:

emmaProgram Advisor Emma Diebold assists with the application process and is here to answer program, cultural and academic questions before departure. Emma completed her undergraduate degree in Geography: Travel & Tourism at Ball State University. She went abroad with the BSU Geography Department to Eastern and Central Europe and has enjoyed personal travels to several destinations including Belgium, France, Ireland, Peru, Ecuador and The Bahamas. Emma joined the IFSA- Butler team to aid students who want to explore the world and advises students planning to study abroad in England. Emma can be reached at the email link above or at 800-858-0229, ext. 4258.


altStudent Accounts Coordinator Angelita Shaffer assists with the financial side of study abroad and processes payments and invoices. Angelita can be reached at the email link above or at 317-940-4221.

 

 

 

altStudent & Parent Services Manager Donnetta Spears is available to both students and parents for travel questions and information. Donnetta has worked with IFSA-Butler since 2000, and she has traveled through parts of Europe, Latin America, Australia and New Zealand. As the mother of 4 college students (including one who studied abroad on an IFSA-Butler program), she has a deep understanding of the ins-and-outs of study abroad from a parent perspective. Donnetta can be reached at the email link above or at 317-940-4252.



Once abroad, our students are in the capable hands of our on-site office, including our resident directors. Click here to read more about Resident Directors Lynne Alvarez and Andrew Williams.


altUpon return from your study abroad program, Assistant Director for Academic Affairs Rhonda Hinkle processes your Butler University transcript and assists with any academic record appeals. Rhonda completed her undergraduate coursework at the University of Evansville and received her master's degree from Bowling Green State University. She also has taken doctoral courses at Ball State University. For Rhonda, study abroad not only increased her awareness of the world around her but also ignited her passion for travel and education. Rhonda can be reached at the email link above or at 800-858-0229 ext. 4259.

Get Connected

Connect with IFSA-Butler Students

If you really want to know what it's like to study abroad, connect with IFSA-Butler alumni and students who are currently abroad on an IFSA-Butler program. Check out the following:
Student Network
Student Blogs
Experiences Abroad Videos
For Students

Pre-Med Option

Overview

St. Anne's College’s Pre-Medical Program is distinguished by its focus on biochemistry and emphasis on independent study. At its heart lies the philosophy that human diseases and clinical treatments can be fully understood only with a detailed knowledge of cellular molecular process. Biochemistry tutors from St. Anne’s College lead the program in collaboration with their colleagues from chemistry, physiology, pharmacology and experimental psychology. Courses are taught through a combination of tutorials and lectures given by experts from St. Anne’s College and the entire Oxford system.

The program is available during the following terms:

  • Fall semester (September-December), designed to help participants maximize their time abroad in a shorter timeframe. The semester combines the Oxford Michaelmas Term with a required September pre-session.
  • Academic year (October-June), the traditional academic year at Oxford that combines all three Oxford terms: Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity.
  • Extended academic year (September-June). A more advanced course of study that includes all three terms at Oxford plus the September pre-session. This is a particularly popular option for students who plan to apply to MD-PhD programs.

The program encompasses five broad themes:

  • Structure and Function of Macromolecules
  • Bioenergetics and Metabolism
  • Molecular Biology and Genetics
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology and Human Disease

Students begin with courses on human physiology and on the structures and functions of biological molecules, including a detailed study of proteins and nucleic acids. Building on this foundation, students are given the opportunity to take advanced options (depending on their term length) in endocrinology, cancer biology, cell signaling, molecular immunology, human metabolism and developmental biology. Alongside these courses, students may take modules in medical ethics, history and philosophy of science. Course descriptions can be found on the course tabs of this website. Fall semester students should only select courses from the September and Michaelmas terms.

Students on the academic year or extended academic year program will conclude their year abroad with the opportunity to produce a written dissertation on a topic of the student's choice, or to pursue a 12-week laboratory project in one of the University's research laboratories. Some pre-med students also organize work experience (clinician shadowing) at one of the University of Oxford hospitals during the Easter vacation.

St Anne's has a strong tradition of medical and biochemical research and the College's tutors include specialists in metabolism, structural biology, molecular biology, neurobiology, psychology, hematology and endocrinology. The college also hosts the Centre for Personalized Medicine which provides a focus for collaboration between Oxford University scientists and clinicians working in a diverse range of fields.

St. Anne's College Pre-Medical Program is highly competitive and a minimum GPA of 3.7 is required.

FAQs

I am a rising sophomore or rising senior. Will I be able to apply for this program?
Yes. St. Anne's pre-medical program has been designed to fit within the typical pre-med course sequence for U.S. juniors, but applications from highly qualified rising sophomores (i.e., applicants currently in their freshman year) and from rising seniors (i.e., applicants currently in their junior year) who want to broaden their undergraduate experiences are welcome.

What term should I select?
There are three terms available:

  • Fall semester (September-December), designed to help participants maximize their time abroad in a shorter timeframe. The semester combines the Oxford Michaelmas Term with a required September pre-session.
  • Academic year (October-June), the traditional academic year at Oxford that combines all three Oxford terms: Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity.
  • Extended academic year (September-June). A more advanced course of study that includes all three terms at Oxford plus the September pre-session. This is a particularly popular option for students who plan to apply to MD-PhD programs.

Are there any considerations that pre-med students on the extended academic year option should be aware of?
Yes. Students will take 13S1 and 25S1 in September and will then choose courses from St. Anne's full academic year course selection for the remainder of the year. This term option will likely result in a large number of transfer credits back to your home school, so we strongly recommend that you consult with your academic advisor and registrar’s office on your home campus to obtain approval for this option.

Can I take laboratory-based (practical) classes in Oxford?
Yes. Students studying for the academic year or extended academic year may take lab classes, providing that space is available. We regret that we cannot offer lab classes to students studying for the fall semester only.

I’d like to do a written dissertation and work in the lab. Is it possible to do both?
No. Academic year and extended academic year students can either produce a written dissertation on a topic of their choice or pursue a 12-week laboratory project in one of the University's research laboratories. These are both demanding options that will require exclusive focus to complete.

How many courses should I list on the St Anne’s application form?
We ask applicants to the fall semester to list at least six courses: 13S1 Biological Chemistry, 25S1 Physiology and four courses (in order of preference) from the course list. You may also choose to study one or more humanities courses (as given on the St Anne’s website) instead of a pre-med course, but please make this clear on your application form.

Have previous St Anne’s pre-med Visiting Students been successful in their applications for medical school scholarships?
Yes. Previous students have secured prestigious scholarships to the Perelman Medical School at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Cambridge and University of Oxford. The tutors at St Anne’s are always happy to write recommendations to support applications to medical school, and having references/testimonials from faculty members on both sides of the Atlantic certainly helps to distinguish a candidate from his or her competitors!

Can I take the MCAT examination while I am studying in Oxford?
Yes. There is an examination center in London (approximately 90 minutes from Oxford), which offers the MCAT. For more information please visit the MCAT website.

September Term Courses

Courses taught in September are available to extended academic year and fall semester students only.

Biological Chemistry [13S1]
This course introduces the major classes of macromolecules found in cells, including nucleic acids, proteins and carbohydrates. Protein primary and secondary structures are explored and the chemistry of amino acid side chains is discussed. Myoglobin and hemoglobin are used as examples to understand the properties of proteins in respiration. Enzymes are investigated highlighting the use of inhibitors to study structure/function relationships. Carbohydrates and membrane proteins are investigated outlining their biological relevance and roles. The course concludes with a discussion of the techniques and methodologies used to analyse the biological macromolecules (including nucleic acids, proteins and carbohydrates) discussed throughout the course. (1 workshop, 5 classes)

Notes: This course is required for all extended academic year and fall semester students.

Human Physiology [25S1]
This course examines the functions of major organs and organ systems in humans. We study nerve function with a focus on the signaling events that take place at synapses and consider how muscle contraction is controlled. Later in the course we cover the kidney and the gastrointestinal tract with an emphasis on diseases affecting these organs. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 26S4 Medical Ethics.

Medical Ethics [26S4]
Topics covered include beginning of life; end of life; the doctor-patient relationship; social inequalities in health care; private versus public health care; women’s health, personalized medicine, stem cells and their applications; metabolic syndrome; and disease of the 21st century. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 25S1 Human Physiology.

Michaelmas Term Courses

Unless otherwise noted, courses taught in Michaelmas term are available to all students.

Genetics and Molecular Biology [11M1]
This course begins with the description of the prokaryotic genome and its regulation, we then cover the organisation of the eukaryotic genome. Transcription and translation are discussed, with a focus on regulation of the macromolecules involved. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Part of the Molecular Cell Biology course run by the Biochemistry Department.

Introduction to Organic Chemistry [11M2]
The course begins by considering the types of bonding found in organic compounds with a particular emphasis on conjugation and resonance. We consider the factors that affect the pKa values of functional groups and that stabilize reactive intermediates. We discuss the phenomena of isomerism and chirality and conclude with a preliminary survey of the different types of reaction found in organic chemistry. (3 tutorials)

Introduction to Biological Macromolecules [13M1]
This course introduces the major classes of macromolecules found in cells, including nucleic acids, proteins and carbohydrates. Protein primary and secondary structures are explored and the chemistry of amino acid side chains is discussed. (1 class and 1 workshop)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 13S1 Biological Chemistry

Introduction to Biophysical Chemistry [13M2]
The first half of this course provides an introduction to quantum mechanics and molecular bonding. The second half introduces Gibbs Free Energy, enthalpy and entropy and considers simple chemical equilibria. (2 tutorials)

Biophysical Methods [21M1]
This course introduces the principles and applications of the major physical methods that are used to determine the structures and dynamics of biological macromolecules. The techniques studied include AFM, NMR, absorption, emission and fluorescence spectra, analytical ultracentrifugation, mass spectrometry and single molecule techniques. (6 tutorials)

Notes: This course cannot be taken with 21M2 Biomolecular Spectroscopy. This course assumes basic knowledge of thermodynamics, quantum mechanics and molecular orbital theory.

Imaging and Spectroscopy [21M2]
This course introduces the principles and applications of the major imaging and spectroscopic methods, which are used to determine the structures, dynamics and thermodynamics of biological macromolecules. The techniques studied include NMR, MRI, absorption, emission and fluorescence spectroscopy. (4 tutorials)

Notes: This course cannot be taken with 21M1 Biophysical Methods. This course assumes basic knowledge of thermodynamics, quantum mechanics and molecular orbital theory.

Bioenergetics [22M1 or 22E1]
This course covers energy transformations in biological systems, in particular those linked to chemiosmotic systems and (force-generating) motor proteins. We discuss systems for electron transfer, ion gradients as an energy store, the FOF1 ATP synthase and related proteins, and motor proteins in muscle. A major focus of these tutorials is the mitochondrion and its role as ‘power house’ of the cell.

Notes: This course will run in both Michaelmas Term and Hilary Term, and can be split between the two terms if required. Fall semester students should indicate interest in 22M1 only, as Bioenergetics 22E1 is split between the Michaelmas and Hilary terms.

Molecular Biology Toolbox [23M1]
This course introduces the molecular biology techniques, which are used to understand gene function. The course covers flow cytometry and the use of FACS for sorting cell populations, blotting (for analysis of DNA, RNA and proteins), molecular cloning and immunoprecipitation (including ChIP), PCR and the use of siRNA for altering protein expression. For each technique the technical aspects are discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages. Alternative methods are also compared.

Molecular Immunology [24M2]
This course explores the molecular events that take place to coordinate an immune response in humans. Topics covered include the complement system of the innate immune system, B cells and antibodies, and T cells and antigen presentation.

Human Physiology [25M1]
This course examines the functions of major organs and organ systems in humans. We study nerve function with a focus on the signaling events that take place at synapses and consider how muscle contraction is controlled. Later in the course we cover the kidney and the gastrointestinal tract with an emphasis on diseases affecting these organs. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 25S1 Human Physiology.

Human Behavior [25M4]
This course introduces the study of mental processes and we begin by examining the experimental techniques used in psychology and neuroscience. We explore the relationship between the mind and the brain and contrast psychological and physiological explanations of behaviour. We introduce some current theories of human thought, and discuss phenomena including perception, memory and reasoning.

History of Science [26M1]
This course presents a historical survey of the development of both the physical sciences and the life sciences. We study the chief architects of a series of revolutions in science including Galileo, Copernicus, Harvey, Descartes, Newton, Lavoisier, Lyell and Darwin. (4 tutorials)

Pharmacology [26M2]
This course explores how the interplay between chemistry and pharmacology has contributed to drug development. The lectures concentrate on specific physiological systems, discussing the chemical targets that these systems provide (receptors or enzymes), and how a pharmacological understanding of these targets has been exploited to develop useful drugs. This course consists of lectures and practical classes only and is not accompanied by tutorials.

Notes: This course is associated with two half-day lab classes.

Medical Ethics [26M4]
Topics covered include beginning of life; end of life; the doctor-patient relationship; social inequalities in health care; private versus public health care; women’s health, personalized medicine, stem cells and their applications; metabolic syndrome; and disease of the 21st century.

Virology [28M1]
We consider the mechanisms of infection and reproduction of a number of human pathogenic viruses including influenza, herpes, HIV and oncoviruses (cancer viruses). We discuss both current and emerging treatments for each virus and consider current progress towards producing effective vaccines, if none are currently available.

Note: This course is only open to fall semester students.

Developmental Biology [28M2]
We consider how cell growth and differentiation are controlled, including the signalling pathways involved. We study the early stages of embryonic development including axis and pattern formation. We explore how model organisms may be used to study embryonic development in animals, with a particular focus on C. elegans. We discuss the principal signalling pathways involved in key developmental events, with a particular emphasis on the role of ras signalling in cell fate specification.

Hilary Term Courses

Courses taught in Hilary term are available to academic year and extended academic year students only.

Bioenergetics [22E1 or 22H1]
This course covers energy transformations in biological systems, in particular those linked to chemiosmotic systems and (force-generating) motor proteins. We discuss systems for electron transfer, ion gradients as an energy store, the FOF1 ATP synthase and related proteins, and motor proteins in muscle. A major focus of these tutorials is the mitochondrion and its role as ‘power house’ of the cell.

Notes: 22E1 runs in both Michaelmas Term and Hilary Term, and can be split between the two terms if required. 22H1 runs during the Hilary term only.

Metabolism and Bioenergetics [11H1]
This course starts with the concept of a metabolic pathway and reversibility/non reversibility in vivo. Using this framework we examine glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogen breakdown/synthesis and their regulation. Oxidative phosphorylation, and the roles of the mitochondrion in catabolism (especially fat metabolism) complete the course. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Part of the Molecular Cell Biology course run by the biochemistry department.

Organic Chemistry: Reaction Mechanisms [11H2]
This course discusses a number of key reaction types: substitution, elimination, addition. A detailed survey of the reactions of the carbonyl group is undertaken. (4 tutorials)

Notes: 11M2 Organic Chemistry is a prerequisite for this course.

Pharmacology [26H2]
This course explores how the interplay between chemistry and pharmacology has contributed to drug development. The lectures concentrate on specific physiological systems, discussing the chemical targets that these systems provide (receptors or enzymes), and how a pharmacological understanding of these targets has been exploited to develop useful drugs. This course consists of lectures and practical classes only and is not accompanied by tutorials.

Notes: This course is associated with two half-day lab classes.

Kinetics and Thermodynamics in Biological Systems [13H2]
The first half of this course considers the kinetics of chemical reactions with a particular emphasis on enzyme catalyzed reactions. We study the Michaelis-Menten equation and explore the different types of enzyme inhibition. Later in the course we consider complex equilibria, including ligand-receptor interactions and maintenance of transmembrane electrochemical potentials. (4 classes)

Enzyme Mechanisms and Carbohydrate Chemistry [13L1]
Continuing on from 13M1, this course continues to investigate the structure of proteins including the standard features covered in the lecture material. Myoglobin is used as an example to understand the properties of proteins in respiration. Enzymes are investigated highlighting the use of inhibitors to study structure/function relationships. Carbohydrates and membrane proteins are investigated outlining their biological relevance and roles. The course concludes in Trinity Term with a discussion of the techniques and methodologies used to analyze the biological macromolecules (including nucleic acids, proteins and carbohydrates) discussed throughout the course. (4 classes in Hilary Term and 1 class in Trinity Term)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 13S1 Biological Chemistry.

Statistical Methods [14H3]
This course covers elementary statistical methods to deal with sampling, confidence limits, analysis of experimental error and regression. Both parametric and non- parametric methods are discussed. Two way comparisons (paired and unpaired data) are included and a brief introduction to ANOVA is given. (4 classes)

Crystallography [21H3]
The course begins by discussing how proteins may be crystallized, and we examine the difficulties encountered when crystallizing membrane proteins. We study how crystals diffract and the challenges posed by analysis of diffraction data. Finally we consider how crystal structures may be evaluated and how they may be used to test mechanistic models. (3 tutorials)

Notes: Completion of 21M1 is a prerequisite for this course.

Membrane Proteins [21H4]
This course focuses on the components of cellular membranes, including lipids and proteins. We explore the structures and functions of ion channels, pores, transporters and receptors and discuss how experimental techniques may be applied to these challenging proteins. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Completion of 21M1 Biophysical Methods is a prerequisite for this course.

Molecular Biology Toolbox [23H2]
This course introduces the molecular biology techniques, which are used to understand gene function. The course covers flow cytometry and the use of FACS for sorting cell populations, blotting (for analysis of DNA, RNA and proteins), molecular cloning and immunoprecipitation (including ChIP), PCR and the use of siRNA for altering protein expression. For each technique the technical aspects are discussed as are the advantages and disadvantages. Alternative methods are also compared. (4 tutorials)

Notes: This course assumes knowledge of DNA structure and basic molecular biology (covered in 13M1).

Cell Signaling [24H1]
The course begins with a study of individual receptors present in cell membranes and discusses how ligand binding to extracellular domains results in the initiation of a cytosolic signalling cascade. The events that produce a nerve impulse resulting from the absorption of photons in the eye are given detailed consideration. Secondary messengers and serine/threonine protein kinases are also covered. (3 tutorials)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 21H4 Membrane Proteins.

Molecular Immunology [24H2]
This course explores the molecular events that take place to coordinate an immune response in humans. Topics covered include the complement system of the innate immune system, B cells and antibodies, and T cells and antigen presentation. (4 tutorials)

Development [24H4]
This introductory course explores how model organisms may be used to study embryonic development in animals, with a particular focus on C. elegans. We discuss the principal signalling pathways involved in key developmental events, with a particular emphasis on the role of ras signalling in cell fate specification. (2 tutorials)

Notes: Completion of 23H2 Molecular Biology Toolbox is a prerequisite for this course.

Oncology [25H2]
Topics covered include hallmarks of cancer and the genetic and metabolic correlates of cancer. We discuss the process of apoptosis (programmed cell death) and how genetic mutations lead to cellular immortality. The course concludes with a critical appraisal of the current approaches to cancer therapy. (2 tutorials)

Notes: Completion of 25M1 is a prerequisite for this course.

Endocrinology [25H3]
These tutorials examine the major organs of the endocrine system including the thyroid, pituitary and adrenal glands and their roles in metabolic regulation and homeostasis. Diseases of the endocrine system including hypo- and hyperthyroidism are discussed and experimental evidence from transgenic model organisms is evaluated. (Metabolic regulation by insulin and glucagon is covered in 22T2 Mammalian Metabolism and is omitted from this course.) (3 tutorials)

Notes: Completion of 25M1 or 25S1 is a prerequisite for this course.

Philosophy of Science [26H3]
This course discusses scientific method and the validity of scientific knowledge, through the work of philosophers including Carnap, Popper and Kuhn. We study the nature of the problem of induction, hypothesis testing, and the role of chance and determinism in science. (4 tutorials)

Trinity Term Courses

Courses taught in Trinity Term are available to academic year and extended academic year students only.

Bioinorganic Chemistry [31T6]
This course explores the role that metal ions play in biological processes. We focus on the roles of divalent (M2+) and transition metal ions in enzyme catalysis and protein structure. (2 tutorials)

Notes: This course may also be offered in Hilary Term.

Advanced Enzymology [31T7]
This course explores the techniques available for studying enzyme mechanisms using kinetic, genetic and structural methods. Topics include: multi-substrate reactions and isotope exchange methods; rapid reaction techniques and pre-steady state analysis; theories of enzyme catalysis; allosteric mechanisms. (4 tutorials)

Notes: 21M1 Biophysical Methods is a prerequisite for this course.

Mammalian Metabolism [22T2]
This course explores carbohydrate and fat metabolism in mammals and the associated human diseases. We begin by considering different types of metabolic regulation and consider how inhibition of individual enzymes affects the flow of substrates along a pathway. We discuss the roles that insulin plays in homeostasis, with a strong emphasis on the metabolic targets of the hormone. We explore the causes and consequences of type 2 diabetes and obesity and discuss the effectiveness of treatments. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 22T3 Plant Metabolism. This course assumes basic knowledge of glycolysis and the TCA cycle.

Plant Metabolism [22T3]
This course examines the pathways that constitute the light-dependent and light- independent reactions of photosynthesis, including the synthetic reactions that take place in C3, C4 and CAM photosynthesis. We consider the role that compartmentalization plays in increasing the efficiency of metabolism and discuss how photosynthetic yield may be enhanced for biofuel production. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 22T2 Human Metabolism. Either 22M1 or 22H1 Bioenergetics must be studied before taking this course.

Advanced Molecular Biology [23T3 or 23H3]
Building on the use of bacterial genetics for molecular biology (molecular cloning), this course covers the processes of DNA replication, transcription and translation. The important players will be discussed including the relevance of these processes in understanding and describing many diseases. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Completion of 23H2 Molecular Biology Toolbox is a prerequisite for this course.

Molecular Biology of Cancer [23T4]
Building on previous knowledge of DNA replication and mutation, we study how non-cancerous somatic cells undergo malignant transformation. We identify key genes directly involved in carcinogenesis and examine how mutations in these genes allow cells to circumvent cell cycle controls. (2 tutorials)

Notes: Completion of 25H2 Oncology and 23M1 Molecular Biology Toolbox is a pre- requisite for this course.

Human Behaviour [25T4]
This course introduces the study of mental processes and we begin by examining the experimental techniques used in psychology and neuroscience. We explore the relationship between the mind and the brain and contrast psychological and physiological explanations of behaviour. We introduce some current theories of human thought, and discuss phenomena including perception, memory and reasoning. (4 tutorials)

Medical Ethics [26T4]
Topics covered include beginning of life; end of life; the doctor-patient relationship; social inequalities in health care; private versus public health care; women’s health, personalized medicine, stem cells and their applications; metabolic syndrome; and disease of the 21st century. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 26S4 Medical Ethics.

Literature Project [27T1]
Students complete an extended essay, typically 5,000 words, which reviews the primary literature in a field of their choice, under the guidance of experts from across the University. Students are required to give a talk in College on their work at the end of Trinity Term. (4 tutorials)

Notes: Cannot be taken with 27T2 Laboratory Research Project.

Laboratory Research Project [27T2]
Students complete a 12-week research project in one of the University's research laboratories. Projects typically begin at the start of the Easter vacation and conclude in the penultimate week of Trinity Term. Students are required to produce a written account of their research (typically 5,000 words) and give a talk in College on their work in the final week of Trinity Term.

Notes: Cannot be taken with 27T1 Literature Project. Must only be selected after discussion with St. Anne's Tutors and your home university. Availability of lab space cannot be guaranteed.

 
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