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Normal, Mundane, and Other Synonyms for School

Time February 21st, 2017 in 2017 Spring, Wales | No Comments by

Sometimes you do pretty normal things even on a different continent.

As I said in my very first, pre-departure post, you get a lot of advice before you leave the country. You hear a lot of stories from those who have studied abroad before you and you see pictures and blogs from peers who spent semesters in Spain, Rome, or wherever the wind took them. But here’s the problem: they only tell you about the adventures. The beautiful sunrises they saw over mount-whatever; the fun nightlife in a certain city; the amazing and inspiring people they met. Yet there is a fundamental detail that is left out of all of these tales—studying abroad involves a lot of completely normal moments. No one tells you that you will still binge-watch Gilmore Girls in bed, or that you’ll have quiet nights where you do nothing, or that you actually have to study for the classes you’re taking.

While this seems like a pretty obvious part of being away for an entire semester, it took me two weeks into classes to actually be okay with it. For the first part of my time abroad, I hated any gaps of free time I had in my schedule. I felt like I always needed to be doing something to make my time here valid and worthwhile. If I didn’t do something fun every night, I wasn’t getting the full “abroad” experience. It wasn’t until I was sitting in my Wednesday morning seminar the other week that I had a huge breakthrough—we were discussing the reading we were supposed to have done for class and I sat there not knowing a thing. I didn’t do the reading because I’m a student abroad, and students abroad most certainly don’t need to do the readings. But as I sat in class in a bubble of confusion wondering why pre-Raphaelite art was considered scandalous to upper class Victorian-era citizens I realized a fundamental fact: I came here to take classes because I’m in college. Read More »

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Three Cliffs Bay, Bath, Stonehenge, and Snowdonia National Park

Time February 7th, 2017 in 2017 Spring, Wales | No Comments by

The other night, I couldn’t sleep. I spent the day doing pretty average stuff; I went for a run, made myself breakfast, walked around the city with some friends, and worked on homework. You couldn’t pick this Monday out of a lineup, but that night I couldn’t sleep. And here’s why: I started to get an itch. A hum in the back of my head. A small little devil-version of me sitting on my shoulder whispering in my ear, “Hey Alex, let’s go somewhere.”

It all started with Three Cliffs Bay. It was a day trip my friends and I signed up for that looked like a promising way to spend a Saturday. After a two-hour bus ride we arrived to what I can only describe as a photo out of a National Geographic magazine. The ocean was bright blue and framed by beautiful, magnificent cliffs. We hiked along side the cliffs for a bit, then climbed down a steep slope to the beach. After a few miles up and down the beach, we hiked back up the cliffs and to an old, rustic castle that overlooked the ocean. It ended up being somewhere between eleven and twelve miles of hiking—we were all so tired by the end of it. But every second of the hike was insanely beautiful.

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Classes, Welsh Cakes, and the Great Outdoors

Time January 30th, 2017 in 2017 Spring, Wales | No Comments by

As I start this post the first thing I’d like to say is that I love Wales. With all of the emotions I feel on a daily basis here, whenever I’m out and about in the city or walking around on campus the feeling I experience most overwhelmingly is excitement. While the past week and a half have felt somewhat like a dream, the reality of a semester abroad has finally sunk in as classes have begun. I did it. I followed through on accomplishing a goal I set for myself long ago, and made my dreams a reality. Now all I have to do is remember that excitement as classes, and real work, begin.

SO, about those classes. Before leaving for the semester, one of the most common questions I was asked was “Alex, what classes are you taking in Wales?” Well, after months of not knowing and not actually figuring out my schedule until the first real day of classes, I can happily say that I am registered. I’m taking three 20-credit courses, each equivalent to about 6 credits on the U.S. scale. I’m taking a Victorian art class, an environmental politics class, and a class looking at how different countries have developed culturally, environmentally, and economically. While normally I wouldn’t be exactly thrilled for classes to start, I am actually very eager to begin learning and have some of my free time taken up. So far the classes seem promising.

Now onto something more exciting than school… Welsh cakes. This past two weeks in Wales has introduced me to something that has exposed the naivety I hold in my culinary experiences. The gap in my pallet. The type of breakfast pastry that I’m convinced could cure the ill, could put an end to all international disputes, and could bring a grown man to tears. A pastry called a “Welsh cake.” For those who don’t know (like me a week ago), a Welsh cake is somewhat of a cross between a cookie, a pancake, and a scone with chocolate chips or raisins. It’s life changing. In my book, Welsh cakes are right up there with Beyoncé. I’ve gotten them a few times on the way to class, and I got them with some of my flat mates when we went into town together. I have a strong feeling that I’ll have to allocate a chunk of my abroad-budget specifically for Welsh cakes.

To work off all of the Welsh cakes, I’ve taken some time to explore the great outdoors. My favorite spot to run so far is this beautiful bike path that goes alongside the river near my flat. Not only is it a stunning view, but it’s a good break in my day and lets me get some fresh air. On Wednesday, some friends and I went on a night hike with a club on campus alongside the bay. It was actually very random, and the club we went with was really strange. It was about a 4 or 5-mile hike in the dark that went through back wood trails that led to a path on a cliff that overlooked the bay. It was one of those experiences that ended with us asking ourselves “what the hell did we just do?” After warming up at a pub and deliriously laughing about how weird it was, we decided that the experience was worth it.

While the night hike isn’t necessarily something I’d do again, it was the kind of experience I was craving. I needed to get off campus and do something a little random and adventurous that I’ll have good memories from. This weekend we’re headed to Three Cliffs Bay for more hiking, and the following weekend I will visit Stonehenge and Snowdonia National Park. I’m starting to realize that if I go into this semester with the right attitude and continue to do things that push my boundaries, I can shape it into whatever experience I want it to be. Hopefully, I’m able to create a semester that exceeds my expectations. So far, I’m thinking I’ll have no problem doing just that.

 

That’s all I’ve got to say for now.

Cheers,

Alex

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From London to Wales

Time January 20th, 2017 in 2017 Spring, Wales | 1 Comment by

Wow, has everything changed! After a long journey from the Minneapolis airport to the Newark airport and finally to the Heathrow airport in London, I can now say that I have hopped over the pond. We arrived in London around 7:30 AM, went through a long customs line, and met with our IFSA-Butler guide. At this point I was feeling so many emotions, but most of all, I was exhausted. I had woken up at 4 AM on Thursday and we landed in the morning on Friday. I managed a 2-hour nap on the flight but surprisingly, plane seats are not to best accommodation for a good night’s sleep. But I didn’t have time to feel tired, because we had landed in London and had a full day ahead of us. I was excited enough to be able to push my tiredness to the side. Read More »

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Pre-Departure Advice… For Myself

Time January 10th, 2017 in 2017 Spring, Wales | No Comments by

Hello, and welcome to my little blog of adventures. My name is Alex and I’m a sophomore from Drake University studying abroad in Cardiff, Wales. I leave in two days but that hasn’t really sunk in. I’ve started to say goodbyes, I’ve begun packing, and I’ve also managed to come down with a horrible cold (great timing, too). And although this week feels like every other week, I am about to embark on a journey that will change my life in a profound way that I won’t be able to understand until it has already happened. I think that’s pretty neat.

The past days, weeks, and months have been filled with preparation. But one thing that every student about to go abroad gets lots of is advice. Those who have studied abroad before you will tell you about how incredible their experience was, what you should do when you’re abroad, and of course where you MUST visit. I love hearing what everyone has to say about traveling—I’m a sponge when it comes to taking in travelling tips and knowledge. But I also want to go into this experience with my own goals and some pieces of advice for myself. So here is what I have to say to the future me that’s about to board a plane into five months of uncertainty and excitement:

It’s okay to cry at the airport when you leave your family, just for the love of God make sure you’re wearing waterproof mascara.

Be frugal and wise with budgeting but don’t freak out about money the whole time. It’ll work out just fine.

Take that trip to Greece that you keep saying you will. You packed that swimsuit for something and it’s not just to take up space in your suitcase.

Drink good wine. Eat good cheese. And bread. And pasta.

Try weird local foods that you probably won’t love but it’s all about the experience amiright?

Do something crazy like bungee jumping or cliff jumping, just don’t tell your parents until after you’ve done it and survived (sorry mom and dad).

Speaking of mom and dad, give them a call every once in a while to make sure they know you’re alive.

Buy little souvenirs for yourself and loved ones.

Visit friends who are abroad in different countries, even if you only get the chance to meet up for lunch.

Take pictures. You suck at this. You brought a camera for a reason. USE IT.

Write down things in a journal because no matter how memorable an experience feels, details will become blurry once you’ve been traveling for five months.

Make friends with people from other countries!

And finally, have a blast because you’re only 20 years old in Europe once ya crazy kid.

This post marks the very beginning of a life changing, comfort-zone pushing, and challenging experience. I have no idea what my life is going to look like in a few days–your guess is probably just as good as mine. I hope you stick around to see how it all plays out, it should be an interesting few months!

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Casey is Counting…the days until she can go back, the amount of money she has left, the number of memories she made, etc.

Time January 4th, 2017 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

It’s official. I am back in the US of A. But before I talk about that, let me tell you about my pre-Christmas adventures!

The first weekend in December was my last real weekend in the UK, so I figured I’d make the most of it! First, I headed to Bath for the crowded Christmas Markets, where I stocked up on Christmas presents for my family, and the Roman Baths. It was quite a fun little trip! Next on the list of places I had to visit was Northern Wales. I got on my first train of seven for the day on my way to Blaenau Ffestiniog, a slate mining town, home to Bounce Below–the largest underground trampoline park in the world! I had a blast at the underground trampoline park! Then, I made it to the town with the longest name in the world–Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.

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Casey Still Celebrates

Time January 4th, 2017 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

Have you ever gone to school on Thanksgiving? Up until today, I hadn’t. The UK doesn’t celebrate Thanksgiving, remember? So last Thursday was a normal school day, filled with professors, reading assignments, lectures, and a full on American Thanksgiving feast.

Yes, that’s right–my flat celebrated Thanksgiving! We had turkey, stuffing (oh my gosh, so much stuffing), mashed potatoes, sweet potato casserole, green beans, rolls, corn–we went all out. For dessert, we even had apple crisp and pecan pie! We made hand-turkeys, listened to Christmas music, and shared lots of laughs. In case you missed the stellar video we all made, please watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XKONuW0-eI

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After my Thanksgiving in the UK, I got on a plane to Amsterdam for my US squad weekend with Emily, Bailey, Sara, and Jessica. We went all over the city on a canal tour, saw the Anne Frank Museum and House, pet lots of rescued cats on a cat boat, went ice skating in front of the Rijksmuseum, and took tons of photos in front of the famous “I amsterdam” letters and, of course, the big yellow clog. We ate giant Dutch pancakes, blue-colored cheese that tasted like lavender, and stroopwafels–all delicious!
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The weekend with them made me realize just how much I’ve missed seeing each of their faces every day like I have for the past two years at school. Lately, I’ve been missing a lot of things, actually. Mostly, it’s just been little everyday things that I took for granted before moving to a different country–97 cent Suave shampoo and conditioner, Wendy’s junior cheesburgers, dryer sheets, etc. It would seem silly to me if I were the one reading this, but, as I write it, it makes perfect sense. These things used to be constants in my life, and I never thought a time would come when I wouldn’t have the option to have them. It’s made life a bit more interesting. Trying to find a deoderant that wasn’t spray-on, or a box of Kraft mac and cheese to make for dinner, while trying to keep the “trolley” (shopping cart) under control–all of the wheels move, not just the ones in the front, so they can be kind of hard to steer–has been quite an experience, I’ll admit.

It’s not that I don’t enjoy trying new things and being in a new place–I absolutely love it! All I mean to say is it has made me a bit more thankful for the things I used to take for granted. I am really looking forward to getting my hands on some of these “delicacies,” but also know that when the time comes for me to leave in just a few short weeks, I will be missing the things I’ve come to see as normal here. I’m already dreading the goodbyes I’ll have to say in 12 days…

In other news, CHRISTMAS IS ALMOST HERE!

Want to know more about me? More about my adventure? More in general? Check out my travel blog “Casey in Cardiff” by clicking here or typing the following into your browser: www.caseyincardiff.weebly.com

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Casey Finds a Cache

Time November 14th, 2016 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

If there’s one thing I’ve learned from the past two weeks, it’s this: if you ever want to see a part of the world—and really see it, like the locals and tourists see it—open up your geocaching app and start walking.

Cork in Ireland, Fort William, Glencoe, and Glasgow in Scotland, and soon to be Cardiff in Wales, would not have been as interesting if it weren’t for the geocaches along the way. The different caches hidden around these cities and villages tend to have a little description about the place they are hidden in, and that little description is usually pretty interesting to the wannabe queen of quirky fun facts (hey, that’s me!). For example, did you know there’s a clock tower in Cork that is called the Four Faced Liar because each of the four faces on their respective sides tell a slightly different time until the hour hits and they all read the hour correctly?? Or that the “fort” in Fort William wasn’t completely destroyed during a war or battle like most castles and forts were, but by a train company in 1894, temporarily turning the fort into a rail yard?? I didn’t think so.

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As you can see, some of the tidbits of information are a little more historical than others. Sometimes the information about the location of the cache is a memory of the person who hid the cache. Other times the descriptions are blank or don’t have any fun facts, just hints. It’s still fun looking around the area each one is hidden in. Some caches are teeny tiny, only big enough to fit a log for you to sign, while others are huge and hold neat little treasures to trade in and out.


If you haven’t been geocaching, or don’t know what it is, you totally should, especially if you want to know more about the town you’re living in! Even if you just want to pretend your Nicholas Cage, hunting for your own little National Treasure (like me), that’s cool, too! For all my E&H friends back home, there are a couple by Emory that are fun, quick finds—I’d totally recommend it.I’m looking forward to finding more geocaches in more of the places I plan on traveling to. It really has been the best way to find all of the best spots in town. Give it a try—you might just find a new hobby, too!

I’m off to find my next cache! Wish me luck!

Want to know more about me? More about my adventure? More in general? Check out my travel blog “Casey in Cardiff” by clicking here or typing the following into your browser: www.caseyincardiff.weebly.com
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Casey Cuts Class

Time November 7th, 2016 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

Want to know more about me? More about my adventure? More in general? Check out my travel blog “Casey in Cardiff” by clicking here or typing the following into your browser: www.caseyincardiff.weebly.com
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Casey Has A Cold

Time October 17th, 2016 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

6 boxes of tissues,
5 cartons of orange juice,
4 hours of sleep a night on average,
3 packs of lemsip,
2 bottles of cough syrup,
1 day of missed lectures,
and about a million cups of tea later…Yes, it’s true. I have a cold. Or the flu. Perhaps even both. Regardless, I am sick, and have been for about a week and a half now. Not cough-cough-I-feel-icky sick, but body-aches-all-over-can’t-stop-coughing-up-my-spleen-lungs-filled-with-snot-fever-gives-me-cold-sweats sick. It has been absolutely horrible. BUT it hasn’t kept me from having a blast here in Wales! Picture

Last Wednesday, I visited Cardiff Bay. I took the touristy pictures (all of which can be seen under the Places I’ve Been tab on my blog), went to a pub, saw lots of pigeons and seagulls, and went home on the train. It was a perfect little afternoon outing.

Friday, I got to participate in the Student Sleepout with my flatmate Meg (until we had to leave because I was too sick to be outside all night). The Student Sleepout was a fundraiser/volunteer experience to bring awareness to the amount and severity of homelessness in

PictureCardiff. A group of students raised money and/or showed their support for a couple homeless shelters in the city by sleeping out on the streets as long as they could. We were each given a cardboard box to sleep on and could only bring whatever we could carry. Some people brought sleeping bags, others snacks, and some just brought the clothes on their backs. At the beginning of the event, two members of the homeless community came to speak to us along with a staff member of one of the shelters in the city. The conversation was very open and honest and helped ease some of the nerves and aided understandings of the experience. It was eye-opening for many of us there.

Monday, I went to the Big Pit National Coal Museum (also under the Places I’ve Been tab on my blog). It was awesome! I got to wear a helmut with a headlamp and go underground in a real coal mine for a tour given by a retired miner. Every time a question was asked to our miner/tour guide, he answered it with a story from his, his father’s, or grandfather’s mining days. I thought going to school in Appalachia gave me some insight into the mining world, but, boy, was I wrong. There is so much more to it than I could ever imagine. The culture, history, and traditions behind the entire coal mining industry here in Wales is rooted deeper (haha, deeper–get it?) than anything I’ve ever known.

Every night, my flatmates and I play a game of cards, specifically the game Contract Rummy. If you don’t know how to play, any of my flatmates and I are well-versed and would be happy to teach you, I’m sure, as we’ve played it practically every night for the past two weeks.

I’ve only got a few little life updates for now. This weekend I’ll hopefully travel some more and be able to give some more exciting updates other than “I smashed my thumb in my bathroom door after being woken up by the fire alarm this morning.”

Until next time! Thanks for reading!

Want to know more about me? More about my adventure? More in general? Check out my travel blog “Casey in Cardiff” by clicking here or typing the following into your browser: www.caseyincardiff.weebly.com
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Casey in Class

Time October 3rd, 2016 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

Now that I’ve accomplished what seemed impossible last weekend–enrolling in classes–and have completed my first week of classes, I feel like I’ve had a decent amount of time to compile the list below:

​10 Things to Know About Uni When Studying Abroad in the U.K.:

  1. Courses are called modules. Classes are called lectures. Schedules are called timetables. Semesters are called terms. If the accent doesn’t give away the fact that you’re from the US, using any of these “American English” terms will.
  2. Professors are not called “Professor” until they’ve earned the title, much like how you wouldn’t call a professor who hasn’t gotten their doctorate “Dr. So-and-so.” Lecturers is a more appropriate term.
  3. My lectures have between 30 and 230 students in them, as opposed to back home, where I’ve never been in a class with more than 20 students. I definitely just feel like a number here (except for in the class in which I was called out for “being the American who emailed a lot of questions ahead of time.” I felt more than just a number in that class for sure…).
  4. University (Uni, for short) and college are not the same thing here like they are at home. When people ask what school I go to back home, I feel like I have to explain myself every time I say “Emory & Henry College.”
  5. Students attend Uni for 3 years, not 4. They don’t use freshman, sophomores, juniors, and seniors as descriptors, but say they are in Year 1, Year 2, or Year 3.
  6. Every lecture is set up the same way. The lecturer stands up in front of the class, opens up a PowerPoint presentation, and begins the lecture, not a second too early and not a second too late.
  7. Lectures are once a week. Not Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. Not Tuesdays and Thursdays. Just one day a week.
  8. Lecturers will send/upload the slides for their lectures before the actual lecture, sometimes as far as two weeks in advance apparently. Students are expected to look at the slides beforehand, take notes on the slides, read out of 20 different books, take notes on those, and then show up to lecture just to take more notes, which they should review and rewrite later, combining them with the notes they took before the lecture. When looking at the amount of prep work students do here compared to the amount I do at home, I feel like I’ve been “college-ing” wrong this whole time.
  9. There is no such thing as a liberal arts education. It is completely unheard of to take classes in different schools. Students pick a school (or major) they want to be in and will only take classes in that school. For all of my E&H readers, this means no Transitions, no Foundations, no GWIC, no Connections, no Modes, etc.
  10. There are no pop-quizzes, no quizzes in general, no tests, no mid-terms, no reflection papers, and hardly any coursework. You can wave participation grades goodbye because there aren’t any of those either. Most of the time, each module will have one or two grades total. Whatever those grades are amount to your final grade. In a couple of my classes, I will have one graded written exam–a 2000 word essay–and in others I will have two written exams that will be averaged together. Yikes!

Side-note: I don’t mean to generalize with this list. It is just what I found to be true with my experience. Although some of these things will probably be a little difficult to get used to, I still feel like I am a normal college student, boarding the struggle-bus and fighting the battles of non-essential spending and procrastination.

In the end, my lectures seem like they’re going to be pretty interesting! I’m already super excited about this semester, and it’s only been a week! 10 more weeks to go! Wish me luck!

Want to know more about me? More about my adventure? More in general? Check out my travel blog “Casey in Cardiff” by clicking here or typing the following into your browser: www.caseyincardiff.weebly.com

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Casey in Cardiff

Time September 28th, 2016 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

I’m in Cardiff and I’ve survived my first week at Uni–what everyone calls University or College here–and am beginning my second! This second week is really Week 1 of Uni, meaning classes finally started today.

Since being here I’ve found a lot of things to be different than back home. For example, Orientation or Week of Welcome doesn’t exist. I was literally dropped off at my flat, handed a sheet of paper with a couple events on it, and told “Good luck. Call if you need anything,” despite not having an international phone plan at the time. Picking classes (the term used here is modules) has been an absolute nightmare. Everyone in Uni here in Cardiff gets put in to classes for their specific school (or major) and only for that school. A liberal arts education does not exist here. Students take classes that apply to their degree and then they graduate–all in three years. And here I am, trying to squeeze everything I want to do in to four! However, I will say that I feel pretty accomplished now that I’ve got a working schedule (everyone here says “timetable”)! Although it was difficult, it got done. I am taking Cross-Cultural Management, Managing People in Organisations (have to make sure I spell it “correctly” here), Reformation History, Globalisation and Social Change, and Power, Politics, and Policy (In class today, there were four stabs at the United States, thanks to last night’s debate…). Not bad, eh?

Freshers Week–Orientation week, if you subtract the academic parts and multiply the social parts by 10x–was loPicturets of fun. I met lots of new people and got to know the city a little better. I still have a lot to explore, though! I plan on exploring more of it this week. Tomorrow, hopefully, my flatmates and I will head on over to Cardiff Bay! This past weekend, some of us took a trip to Brecon Beacons National Park and hiked to the peak of Pen y Fan–one of the best hikes I’ve ever done! I was blown away–literally and figuratively, meaning it was absolutely breathtaking, but the wind was so strong, I found myself almost blowing off the mountain a few times! Check it out under the “Places” tab under the “Connections” tab on my blog caseyincardiff.weebly.com! There, you’ll also find photos from my trips to London, specifically from the day trip I took to see Sara and Bailey! It was great seeing them. #wheredasquadat #squadabroad

I’d love to share more, but my tummy is pretty full from my flat’s second Taco Tuesday, which is making me kinda sleepy. I have to write up some notes from my lecture today (Yes, just one! Another fabulous difference between the US and UK! I only have each class once a week and no more than two classes in general a day!) and prepare for my two lectures tomorrow. Wish me luck as I brave the next week! I’m super excited for everyone else I’ll get to meet, everywhere else I’ll get to go, and everything in between!

 

 

Want to know more about me? More about my adventure? More in general? Check out my travel blog “Casey in Cardiff” by clicking here or typing the following into your browser: www.caseyincardiff.weebly.com
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Casey Through Customs

Time September 15th, 2016 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

This post is coming to you from the UK! London, to be exact! Yes, you read that correctly: London. I’m not in Cardiff yet! Let me explain; IFSA-Bulter (the program I am studying abroad through) has an orientation of their own for all 190 students studying on the island of Great Britain (Fun fact: out of the 190 students, I am the only one studying at Cardiff University!). So, here I am, staying in a nice hotel one street away from Oxford Street–one of the places I was told I had to see. Despite the minor jet lag I experienced, I’ve already had one heck of a trip, starting before I’d even left the country!

Having experienced the fastest check-in and security check in an airport ever, I had plenty of time to hang out before boarding my Icelandair plane. While waiting, I noticed a man who kept walking back and forth in front of me, occasionally stealing a glance my way, and then a woman doing the same thing. My red flags were flying higher than ever before when the man and woman, now together, approached me and asked if I knew a “fun woman” named Monica Hoel (Shout-out to Monica for being a fun woman!). Well, of course I know Monica, just like every other Emory & Henry College student and alum! The couple proceeded to explain their stalker-ish behavior–they were trying to read my t-shirt and tag on my bag to make sure they read “Emory & Henry College.” They had both graduated from Emory years ago! We chatted about the school, different people we knew, the study abroad programs, and much more! What a small world!! Read More »

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Casey in Cymru

Time September 12th, 2016 in 2016 Fall, Wales | No Comments by

That’s right, folks; this girl is leaving the country in two days. Not for good or anything (although, with the upcoming election, I might stay a little longer than planned…). The fall semester of my junior year in college will be spent abroad. For three months, I will be studying at Cardiff University, which is located in Cardiff, Wales. Before you open a new tab and type “Where is Wales?” into your favorite search engine, let me try to help you out a bit…

​Wales is a country in the U.K. North of Wales lies Scotland, England can be found to the right, and Ireland and Northern Ireland are just across the pond to the left. People in Wales speak English, but some also speak Welsh. Welsh is full of cool words like CymraegCymraeg is the word in Welsh for Welsh. Cymru is the word for Wales, the country. Cwn is valley. And my personal favorite: Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch is the name of a small town. It translates to “St. Mary’s Church in the hollow of the white hazel near a rapid whirlpool and the Church of St .Tysilio near the red cave.” Want to know how to pronounce that one? Watch this weatherman nail it! Another neat thing about Wales is that the Welsh national flag has a giant red dragon on it. Wales is looking pretty awesome right about now, isn’t it??

While I’m going to be studying abroad in Wales for the next three months, that doesn’t mean I’m going to stay in Wales and only Wales. I plan on traveling everywhere I possible can while in Europe. Traveling is slowly becoming a passion of mine. I love getting to experience new cultures, learn about their traditions, each place’s history, try their foods, etc. Right now, I have a growing list of places I want to visit, things I want to see, and people I can’t wait to meet while abroad.

Along with that list, I’ve been adding to another list of my own every time I talk to someone about my upcoming semester abroad. I’ve formed a list of advice I’ve been given and would like to share it with you all. Some of you reading this might even see something familiar!

Advice for Casey, provided by many.

  • Be safe.
  • Buy a sleeping bag/sleeping pad to sleep on in hostels. You don’t want to sleep in those sheets! 
  • Hostels are awesome–take advantage of them. And their free books! 
  • Take a suitcase with wheels. 
  • Do you play sports? Doesn’t matter. Tryout for a team anyway. 
  • Drink it all in–literally, you’ll be of age. 
  • Don’t pay for an international phone plan. 
  • Pay for an international phone plan. 
  • Don’t forget your passport.
  • Travel everywhere. 
  • Bring a frisbee. It’s a great tool for meeting new people. Everyone loves frisbee!
  • Have a glass/can of lemonade. It’ll be the best tasting lemonade you’ve ever had. 
  • Buy your Christmas presents while abroad.
  • Take the train. 
  • Join every club/society you can. 
  • Don’t take more than one suitcase. 
  • Take pepper spray everywhere you go. 
  • Save all of your receipts. They’re good souvenirs for people you forget to buy souvenirs for. 
  • Meet up with my cousin/mum/uncle/dogsitter’s boyfriend/etc. 
  • Go shopping on Oxford Street in London. 
  • Buy an actual map. Don’t rely on that stupid GPS thing. Siri can and will be wrong and you’ll wind up in the middle of a sheep farm. 
  • Learn the name Gareth Bale. Period. 
  • Buy a bike. 
  • Don’t leave your luggage to pee, even if you’ve just had two large Mountain Dews, a cup of coffee, and a full Nalgene water bottle. 
  • Go to class. 
  • Skip out on class. 
  • If you feel safe, go on trips alone–gives you a sense of independence and freedom when you’re tired of your flatmates and missing home. 
  • Take pictures of everything.
  • Visit [insert place in Europe here]. It’s the coolest place in the world!

 

As you can see, I’ve been given all kinds of advice (and too many places to visit to list them all). Will I follow all of it? Probably not. Will I try? Probably. What I am going to promise to do, though, is compile a list of advice based off this list given to me and my experiences while abroad to share with others wanting to spend a semester abroad.

As my friends who are also studying abroad either settle in to their cosy new beds for the semester or settle into their not-so-cosy plane seats for the next 8-12 hours, I will continue to cherish my last couple days in the good ‘ole U.S. of A., sipping on a smoothie, snacking on leftover Chinese take-out, and watching Gilmore Girls on Netflix.Until then, see you soon, Cymru!

P.S. Keep the advice coming! I love all of it, even if it’s something I’ve been told a million a one times! I want to know all our your suggestions, too! Thanks!

Want to know more about me? More about my adventure? More in general? Check out my travel blog “Casey in Cardiff” by clicking here or typing the following into your browser: www.caseyincardiff.weebly.com
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Suggestions and Observations 2

Time October 28th, 2015 in 2015 Fall, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

Use the school’s library. Most of the others in my classes have been buying the books, so the library’s copies have been available for use.

 

Printing is NOT free. Make sure that what you print is absolutely necessary, or else be prepared to factor in a sizable printing budget. Typically just showing a receipt on your phone is enough though.

 

Getting into London takes a while (see previous post on bus/coaches). Taking the train is faster and probably less time consuming, but also a bit more expensive; I would recommend it if you get the student traveler’s card, since the discount and time can make up for the cost.

London is especially troublesome traffic wise. I went with the school’s Anime Society (clubs are for sports in the UK.) to MCM London, and it took us an extra hour, just to leave the city in the evening. We left London at 6pm, and got back to Cardiff near 11. We also had to leave Cardiff at 5:30am. London IS close enough for a day trip, but it’s not fun.

 

Laundry is not inside the flat in Talybont; it is consolidated in a building. Trash disposal is also consolidated. Be prepared for walking in the rain. A large and sturdy umbrella is required.

It hasn’t been too rainy in Cardiff… but everyone tells me there’s a big YET that must be attached to that statement. I will describe it when I see it.

 

The Cardiff Student Union runs a lot of events; some of the longer trips will make you miss classes. Make sure your lecturers are OK with that first.

On that note, there are three main forms of address for “professors” in the UK, Professor is a special mark like tenure, and is probably even harder to get, it is even harder to get than Dr. the second tier of address, the third group are just lecturers, and I haven’t quite figured out how e-mails to them etc. should be addressed. Good Luck.

 

Time has been going crazy fast for me; this is a first for a school year. Probably because I feel like I’m not doing as much as I should be exploring. I’m halfway between wanting to be a tourist, and focus on going places, and wanting to be a good student, and not do things to get work done. I have not yet found my balance. Expect to feel like you’re not able to do as much as you hopped, even if you have scouted out some points of interest like I did beforehand. I’d recommend staying till January if you’re only a semester student, as then you have the winter to properly explore.

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Adventure Weekend

Time October 28th, 2015 in 2015 Fall, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

TL; DR: It was good. I chose an all-day event, so I can’t give good suggestions on what to do. If you’re attending IFSA, then go, because it’s better than a weekend in the dorms.

 

Full Version:

Sorry for the late posting, I got a cold and a ton of homework right after it finished, so I’ve been near out of commission for the last few weeks.

The event was in the Snowdonia region, and we were based out of a little resort town called Llanberis. The hotel was nice, but the influx of college kids basically broke the wifi. I know, because my group got there about an hour before everyone else; Cardiff is approx. a five hour drive, London, six.

One of the interesting things about catching a coach (van), or bus (think greyhound), is that drivers are required to take rest breaks, and those usually last 30-50 minutes, so remember to add that to the google maps estimate.

I only needed a backpack. I brought no homework with me, having done most of it during the week leading up, so getting that mental rest was nice as well. I slept early too; after going to bed near 12am, a 9-10pm bedtime was a nice change.

 

On arriving, the hotel was pretty nice; it was probably built during the Victorian period, and it shows in the lobby and dining rooms. The bedrooms were modernized, and there was a bathtub, which made the trip worth it in my opinion.

I choose to do the all day hike up Mount Snowdon, the bath felt very good after it.

 

As I did an all day event, I didn’t get to try some of the other cool stuff like gorge scrambling, or trampolining in a cave. The hike was a good hike, if you’re used to going to national parks. I wouldn’t recommend it to someone who’s never really left a city before, but I’m nowhere near in shape, and I did it, so if you own a good pair of hiking boots, you’re probably good for it.

The group recommended both a jacket for warmth, and one for rain, so make sure that you have those. If the group follows those rules, you should be able to get back to the hotel approx. an hour before any of the other groups (we left near 9am, and were back by around 4.) One thing I’d suggest to any of the more eco-conscious is to bring a sturdy plastic bag to do some trail clean up on the way down. It helps you notice different things on the way down. My group decided to do it on a whim using the paper lunch bags we had been given. Some ripped, so I’d suggest a more durable plastic.

 

Food was OK, and I didn’t go to their bar, so I don’t know about that. There is a town, but I did not explore it. You need relatively little money on the trip, so there’s no need to bring much, unless you intend to buy souvenirs from North Wales.

 

On Sunday, we did a detour up to a seaside resort town of Llandudno before returning to Cardiff. It being October, the town was pretty empty comparatively. Walking around it was nice; the town had its WWI/military remembrance service, so it was probably busier in town than what I’d guess it usually was. We didn’t get too long there.

 

After that was a five-ish hour return drive, so don’t try keeping any plans for Sunday. You probably won’t be back in time, unless it’s a night event.

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Things I would have done differently/wish I had known before arriving in Cardiff

Time October 5th, 2015 in 2015 Fall, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

It takes a day to unpack, and two weeks plus to settle in.
I am still not done with the things I need to do to feel officially done with moving in, so here are some things I wish I had done differently/knew about before coming to Cardiff:

1) That I had the choice of picking up my Biometric Residence Card from the Cardiff University Student’s Union. I didn’t see that option on my visa application, and I had to find my way to the nearest post office with just my google maps as my guide.
2) That I had gotten my ID and Residence card my first day in. It would have made opening my bank account much easier. I currently am still waiting for my appointment, so if you plan to go to Cardiff for a year, make getting an appointment at the bank of your choice a priority. One useful piece of advise is that the bank that is in the Student Union charges a fee for having an account with them. I chose to try for Lloyds, but everyone else seems to have as well. (There are two other Universities in Cardiff, and they have internationals as well)
3) The Student Union offers wristbands. They are competing with other “Fresher” events sets/wristbands (they may be called “freshers” but everyone seems to go). Know which set your flatmates are choosing, or you will be left out. I can only recommend the “Give it a Go” wristband. I did not really go to much of the dances, because I am used to being home at about 12am, and the dances don’t really start really getting big until 1.
4) Be warned that UK students stay up much later than their American counterparts, and are much more used to alcohol.
5) There are differences in bedding from where I am from; duvets need duvet covers, and duvet covers come with pillowcases, so there really is no need to buy separate cases.
6) Even though you’re told to try to scrounge from what other people leave behind, you are probably going to need to buy your own cooking gear. Know what kinds of things you need and how to check if they are good. The one good thing is that Cardiff holds a rummage sale for this kind of stuff, so dishes and silverware can be gotten cheap.
7) You need a phone for Tesco, and if the room’s welcome packet doesn’t change, there will be a simcard from Giff-Gaff inside of the playing card deck it gives. It appears to be one of the better options, and the one the international students at the help desk recommended to me. DO your own research, but be sure you know exactly what a company needs for registration before you get to the UK. I didn’t look at the application page, and that made me lose some time.
8) Clubs are for sports, and Societies are for what I’d think of as clubs. You can really only choose so many, and you have to pay a fee to be in any of them. Go to their “taster” or “Give it a Go” events before the Club fair if possible, certain clubs may have discounted joining fees, so knowing what you’re paying for is a good idea. I did a impulse buy, and am regretting it. I am not regretting the club I went to a taster of.
9) A second thing to note is that many club and society meeting schedules overlap, be sure to not pick more than a total of four to five in total to not feel like you’re skipping out on all of the events you’ve paid fees to go to.
10) Courses do not talk to each other, and all of them will have different methods of registering you for courses. Be Warned.
11) People wear dark colors, even at night. If you wear “light” anything, you will stand out. Even medium toned blues can stick out. I have seen bright colors, but I do not yet know when things are allowed, so good luck with your own wardrobe.
12) Unless you are in a science, assume you will have a lot of down time, and make sure you stay busy during them all. There are supposed to be a lot of papers that will sneak up on you.
13) Go to any International info sessions you get told about, and go to the study abroad office, not the International student’s office, to insure that you’ve heard about all the meetings just in case. Learning how to use the school’s tech is terrifying even after the how tos, so trying to do it by yourself is not advisable.
14) Cardiff offers free language courses. You do need to buy books from them. Wednesdays are a good slot for them, but Wednesdays are also educational half-days, so know that you are probably going to be missing out on club/society stuff to do the courses.

That’s all I can think of at the moment, I’ll do a better reflection on the City of Cardiff once I’ve seen more of it.
You can just stay mostly around the University and the closer parts of city centre without much effort.

 

P.S. Words mean different things here e.g. “college” basically means high school, and there really aren’t American style colleges in the UK, because college is something that people choose to do here, rather than feel they must like at home.

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On the Night of Arrival

Time September 15th, 2015 in 2015 Fall, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

So I’ve made it to the UK without any problems. I apparently shouldn’t have been so worried about customs, as they only really cared about meat and dairy, along with the usual duty frees, rather than about the candies and gifts I had brought with me.

 

My first reflection on traveling is that I should have brought a large converter with me. Back home, it was suggested that I get the plug converters for my products (apple computer & iPhone, and a second computer) I couldn’t find the apple parts at the store I went to, so I ended up having to buy a single plug converter in London. As such, instead of having three working wires, I have one working converter. I may have to buy a second in Wales, seeing as I tend to need to charge my phone and computer at the same time (though I could get creative and simply keep my phone charged by syncing it every day.)

 

I forgot a couple things while packing, but none of them were too important, and hopefully can be replaced once I get to Cardiff. I’m already looking forward to shopping for a sturdy second-hand jacket or coat, as the wind seems to be able to get through my thin jacket too easily.

 

It’s two days till I arrive at Cardiff, so there’s not too much to say yet, as such, I’ll go and introduce myself with the page space I’ve got left:

 

I’m Travis Nishii, fifth generation Japanese-American, gay, and an English major (creative writing).

These are probably the “big” things, though I feel like my choices of music and books in my first post are much more accurate in describing me.

I’m interested in languages, and as such, I’m planning to be in Welsh 1, and I’m hoping to take advantage of Cardiff’s Languages for All program to learn

German (I was hoping to take Arabic but that won’t be until second semester.)

 

I still don’t know how course application works, so here’s hoping everything will be cleared up on Thursday, as I only have till Sunday to sign up.

 

I guess I’ll end here today, and then write an extra post on my experiences signing up for courses, once Thursday/Friday comes round.

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Can’t sleep the night before.

Time September 14th, 2015 in 2015 Fall, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

It’s a good thing the flight is in the evening, because I can’t fall asleep.
It could be that it’s because I’m in New York for the first time in my life, and bedtime shifted from midnight/1am, to 2/3am, plus naps. Or it could be that I am finally going on a trip I’ve been panicking over for the last couple of months.

Some pre-departure heart attacks included finding out that IFSA-Butler sets up my contacts through them (I mean, I guess I should have known that might happen), and flailing about trying to figure out whether or not I should change the e-mail and address they set up to my actual ones (I decided to leave it in place because, hey, they’re technically paying the bills). While another was insuring that my visa was done far enough ahead (only real heart attack there was seeing the cost of the visa and health care.)

Overall, I am very excited.

I decided I wanted to go to Wales after taking a course called “Celtic Lit.” Wales had the stories I liked best: Melog, a contemporary novel, and the Mabinogion, a collection of stories (the mabinogi, and other tales) that are the base for Arthurian myth.

After the course, and its basic welsh pronunciation lesson, I started trying to find welsh language music on YouTube (I found two bands through it: Sŵnami and Y Bandanna) and BBC’s C2, my favorite program is Guto Rhun (I found more Sŵnami there, along with other contemporary bands).

After I applied to Cardiff, IFSA-Bulter’s suggested readings also helped. I chose the recently updated Rough Guide to Wales as my main book because it had a great culture notes section in back with its own selected books. I found another good artist, the Super Furry Animals and their Welsh language album Mwng, through their recommendations.

My favorite book of those I had read as “research” was a story called The Owl Service (plates). While the only movie Netflix had from the recommended list was The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill but Came Down a Mountain.

Packing was relatively easy; I just brought my few cold-ish weather clothes (I’m from Hawaii, so I don’t really have anything warmer than jeans and a jacket), and my well-used wet weather gear.

I’ll go do a proper introduction next time. I have to try and sleep now.

P.S. I’m currently in New York. I’ll go and figure out where the “Location” tab has run off to later.

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This Is What Are Dreams Are Made Of

Time April 13th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

I feel like the past few days have been a dream, they were so surreal and wonderful that I can’t believe they actually happened, but then I flip through the over 300 pictures that I have and I’m right back on the winding streets of Rome with some of my best friends complaining about how much we’ve walked and planning our next gelato stop. Until now, Rome has just sort of been a place that doesn’treally seem real. It’s a place of such immense history and culture you would have to spend years there to really be able to see it all. We had 3 days.

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European Explorer

Time April 6th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

As I’m writing this, I am sat at the Marseille-Provence airport for my second flight of this 3 week European adventure waiting for our boarding call (we were supposed to board like 2 minutes ago and don’t even have a plane yet so we’ll see how this goes). We had a very brief stay in Marseille, and it wasn’t all sun and sea, but it was still a lovely start to a crazy few weeks.

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I See The Sea

Time March 25th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

Time continues to fly by over here, which is both a good thing and a bad thing. On the plus side I’m moving away from schoolwork and towards break, but on the other hand I’m moving closer and closer to having to leave. I’m both extremely excited and incredibly anxious about the next few months so I decided to take it day by day and try not to think too much about what I have coming up.

Since about the time I first decided that I wanted to study in Wales, I’ve been online searching for ways to really see this country and embrace everything it has to offer. During those hours of endless Internet searches I discovered a company called Where When Wales, which is a small tour company operating out of Cardiff that offers affordable tours to amazing places around much of Wales. When I finally got over here I did some more investigating of the tours, and based on suggestions from numerous people, the Gower Explorer tour to the Gower Peninsula was the must-see. Everyone I have ever talked to has said the Gower Peninsula is one of the most beautiful places in Wales so I had to get there.

We booked the tour about a week before we were intending on taking it with no problems at all, and then spent the entire next week patiently awaiting Sunday. I was so excited.

Sunday finally rolled around with an aggressive 7:30 am alarm and a quick breakfast before we set off for our day. One of the best parts about this company, at least for us as Cardiff residents, is that the pick up and drop off location is in front of the National Museum, which is an easy walk for us. Our walk ended up being way faster than we anticipated so we had some time to just sit on the museum steps and watch the city of Cardiff wake up. I realized how little Cardiff feels like a major city, it may have a population of over 300,000, but it still genuinely feels like a smaller city. We still have a lot of the accessibility of a major city, but not so much the overwhelming atmosphere.

At a little before 9am, the WhereWhenWales mini-coach pulled up in front of the museum and we were greeted enthusiastically by Jan, our fearless leader, and her husband John, the courageous driver. There were nine of us (seven American) and from the start, Jan and John spent time getting to know us, so much so that it felt like we had known them for years. They were so incredibly kind and welcoming it made the amazing tour even more fun.

Our first venture brought us to Swansea, the second largest city in Wales, and the National Maritime Museum. We weren’t there long, but we got to see the marina and all the boats in front of the museum before heading inside to check out some of the exhibits. It’s a relatively small museum, but it was recently refurbished so it’s very nice and innovative. There were some really cool transportation vehicles from history, including a two-person bicycle from the Victorian age and a one seated, tiny car that was designed to battle London traffic. After our brief viewing of the museum, we were back on the bus listening to Jan narrate the ride with tons of interesting facts about the area, and Wales as a whole, including making sure we all knew when we were passing Catherine Zeta-Jones’ house. We were finally to the coast and the views.

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We pulled off the road into Langland Bay and I was blown away. This kind of tropical view is probably one of the last things I expected to see in Wales, it’s like the true hidden treasure of this to often overlooked country. It may be one of the rainiest places, but it has incredible tropical beaches with surfers and everything. This stop of the tour allowed time for a walk along the coastal path from Langland Bay to nearby Caswell Bay. I learned that Wales actually has a coastal path that follows the entire perimeter of the country, and is the first country to ever do so. The path we walked along was absolutely breathtaking. It was by far one of the most amazing moments of my entire life. I have never seen anything like it, but it wasn’t just the views, it was the entire atmosphere. It was an absolutely pristine day; sunny and blue skies, and we were surrounded by people who were also out there enjoying the gorgeous environment we were surrounded by. By far my favorite part of the walk was the smell. You always hear about the “fresh ocean smell” and you see it in all sorts of air fresheners and candles, but out there it was real. It was fresh and clean, and it was mixed with the faintly floral smell of the flowers that line the path, and it was amazing.

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After our walk, we set off to Rhossli Bay, which has been voted the #9 best bay in the entire world, and it is much deserved. The bay is immaculate; sandy beaches and limestone cliffs at the base of mountains that we explored for hours. There is an adorable little town at the top of the cliffs where we grabbed some sandwiches before heading down to the beach.

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Down on the sand we wandered for a while, taking in the scenery and just enjoying the weather. It was really cool to be down there because not only is there the ocean, but there is the remains of the shipwreck of the Helvetia, which is kind of surreal to see. I don’t really know anything about the ship (and have forgotten what Jan told usabout it) but it’s very strange to think that the pieces of wood sticking out of the sand used to be a massive ship. To leave the beach, we scaled a small incline and climbed a very steep hill that left us out of breath, so we rewarded ourselves with some delicious Welsh ice cream.

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Helvetia shipwreck.

The rest of our time in Rhossli was spent exploring the path along the cliffs leading out to Worms Head, a very uniquely shaped landmass so named because it looked like a serpent to the people who discovered it (worms head in their native tongue loosely translates to serpent). We tried to make our way down to climb it but unfortunately didn’t really have enough time; I’ll just have to come back some time to try again.

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Our last stop on the tour brought us to a more inland portion of the peninsula to see Arthur’s Rock, a location thought to be a Neolithic burial ground. To get to the rock, we had to walk through a field that just so happened to be the residence of a local herd of wild ponies. It was pretty spectacular to just walk through this herd that remained seemingly unfazed by us.

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The rock itself didn’t really stand out that much (I think after you see Stonehenge any rock is just sort of a rock) until John got to telling us about it’s history. Originally it would have been built like a mound that you could go inside of, but it has since collapsed. Historians thought it might be a burial mound, but as no human remains have yet been discovered, they think it may have just been a ‘mead stone,’ or magical rock worshipped by the pagans. Tradition held that visitors would walk up to it, rub their hands together (‘to get the energy flowing’) and touch it with both hands to absorb the magic, so obviously we did the exact same thing.

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However, this stone may not have just been for magic. John told us that legend has it that this rock was the rock that housed the legendary sword of Excalibur that could only be removed by King Arthur. Sure enough, on the front of the rock is a slit that would have held the sword. I would have never believed it had that slit not been there. Why else would it be there? I am 100% convinced that we touched the rock that Excalibur was embedded in, absolutely surreal to think about.

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Unfortunately, our encounter with a legend was also our last stop and we were then on our way back to Cardiff. I had such an incredible experience that I will no doubt be taking another WhereWhenWales tour. It was completely worth the money to see more of the spectacle that is the country of Wales.

While it was by far the highlight, the tour wasn’t my only adventure this week. As a spontaneous last minute decision, I decided to join some friends on a Wednesday afternoon trip to a different Welsh coastline. We hopped on a train after lectures and made our way to Bridgend, where we grabbed a seat on the bus to Porthcawl. Our afternoon was spent exploring another amazing beach. I have a very strong attachment to seeing the ocean, which is ironic seeing as I have a very strong aversion to the sand that so often comes along with it. For the most part this beach was stone (which I absolutely adored) but there was a bit of sandy portions that I tried my hardest to avoid.

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I don’t know how I’m going to be able to cope with returning to landlocked Minnesota after falling in love with being by the sea. We may be the land of 10,000 lakes, but it’s just not the same. Just add spectacular ocean views to the list of reasons why Wales is amazing.

This Friday is officially my last day of classes before Easter Break, which is also the beginning of my three-week adventure around Europe. That means very limited time and Internet connectivity. My goal is to get a post up about each location we get to so hopefully I’ll find the time to make it work. They’ll all get up eventually, it’s just a matter of when. So hopefully the next time you here from me I’ll be in *drum roll* Marseille, France!

 

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Adventures in Space, Time…and Southern Wales

Time March 18th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

This post is a bit of a conglomeration of a few different adventures because I wanted to keep last week’s post only about Adventure Weekend, as it was a pretty big event. So technically this post is about this week and last week, but rather than make two separate ones I figure why not just write them together and save the extra post for something more productive (I’ve got a couple of ideas brewing for some less narrative posts and more informative/reflective stuff but I’m waiting to find time to sit down and plan them out and unfortunately procrastination keeps rearing it’s ugly head around here).

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Adventures In The North

Time March 11th, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

I’m back in Cardiff sat at my desk, alternating between writing this blog, editing an essay I have due Tuesday, filtering through pictures to post, and unpacking my suitcase. Earlier today I spent 5 hours traveling from North Wales, into England, and back to South Wales, even though I wish I could have stayed in Snowdonia for another month. This past weekend was the big IFSA Adventure Weekend, and it was probably one of the most amazing weekends of my entire life.

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No Capes.

Time March 2nd, 2015 in 2015 Spring, College Study Abroad, Wales | No Comments by

I may have already experienced this week, but I still can’t really believe that it happened. I got to experience some incredibly surreal moments, all whilst dealing with being a college student. The study abroad experience offers so many incredible opportunities, that I will likely never have the chance to experience again, and I am so incredibly excited to be here.

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