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How do you Describe Australia?

Time October 17th, 2016 in 2016 Fall, Australia | No Comments by

I have a hard time defining what it means to be “Australian” almost as much as I have defining what it means to be “American.” I could describe how I feel being American, but I’m sure that someone who lives even only an hour from me has a completely different definition. It’s hard to find those small, common threads across a culture as multicultural as Australia’s or America’s. If anything I think the fact that everyone within the country is so different is a defining factor of the culture.

Before I came to Australia, I definitely had a bit more of a stereotypical image of Australians, only really receiving information on the country from the media around me. I loved watching the Crocodile Hunter when I was little, H20 was a show I watched in middle school, and everything else about the country seemed so remote. Mermaids and crocodile hunting were definitely more of a fantasy of mine when it came to Australia, but the beaches, wildlife, and landscapes were not. I came for the wildlife, that was always my number one reason for coming here, and in that aspect I have not been dissappointed, but also I guess I didn’t realize just how many other aspects there are to Australia. Like we watched in class and in the tourist commercials for international travellers, the brilliant landscapes and relaxed atmosphere are what seemed to be sold the most about Australia, but after coming here, those aspects have kind of taken a back seat. If anything, I felt more resonation with the Quantas commercials even though Australia isn’t my home because I understand that it is home for so many. It’s bizarre to say that but when you’re travelling it’s easy to forget that your vacation spot for someone else is where they’ve lived their entire lives. Once you open your eyes to that I think you experience more of the authenticity of the country you’re in.

You can connect to the people more personally and you may even start to feel like a “local” yourself. Adelaide is not my “home” but I feel at home here even after only being here a few months. The touristy commercials and expectations have faded away. Sure, I’ve experienced plenty of those things from diving in the Great Barrier Reef or petting a kangaroo, but I’ve also been invited over for a homecooked meal with Australian friends, gone for long walks around the city, and experienced life that’s not a vacation in a place that’s often looked at from that perspective where I come from.

It’s made me think about home a lot, specifically how I maybe don’t appreciate my own city for all the little hidden quirks or surprises it has. We had a conversation in my Australian Classics class the other day about a novel we’d read that takes place in Adelaide. In many points throughout the novel, the author describes with fervent detail small places around Adelaide, down to the names of the streets they’re on. The tutor asked if the class felt that the extreme descriptiveness might hinder readers who aren’t from Adelaide. A few people nodded in agreement but I felt, being an outsider, a little differently. Hearing the city being spoken of with such familiarity and fondness, though I may not have understood all of the references, I understood the feeling the author was trying to portray. The feeling of home, and knowing your own like the back of your hand. I don’t know Adelaide like that, even now, but getting to know it has been such a journey, and I feel more closely connected to the city because of it.

Here’s some photos from a little expedition I took around the city to try and capture the place I’ve been lucky enough to call home for the past few months.

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A local performer at Rundle Mall. Performers of all kinds can always be found up and down the strip of shops including a didgeridoo player, jugglers, escape artists, violinists, and more.

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A view of Rundle Mall (including the famous Mall Balls) from atop the Adelaide Arcade.

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University of South Australia students display their fashion designs inside of the Adelaide Arcade.

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A view of the Adelaide Arcade from the balcony.

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One of the many amazing street art paintings on display throughout Adelaide.

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The mural at the end of Rundle Mall, always changing and receiving additions from all different artists.

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Street art by Peter Drew as part of the art movement throughout Adelaide called “Real Australians Say Welcome”.

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An example of some of the old-fashioned buildings still remaining throughout Adelaide.

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Relaxing by the Botanic Gardens.

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A gorgeous greenhouse found inside the Botanical Gardens.

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Bridge leading to the University of Adelaide covered in hundreds of locks, very much like the Pont des Arts in Paris but luckily not collapsing.

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Some of the many black swans that can be found down at the River Torrens.

 

 

 

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