Student Blogs & Vlogs | College Study Abroad Programs, IFSA-Butler

Losing signal and finding connections

Time March 22nd, 2017 in 2017 Spring, Chile | No Comments by

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The rest of our travels passed in a blur of long bus rides, new experiences and adrenaline. We often went without wifi or service for days at a time and when we did have internet connection, it was not strong enough to work on my computer. Although this made it difficult to blog, it allowed me to take a step back from the comfort and personal value that I had been conditioned to place in my phone as a means to connect with the people around me. Not having access to internet reminded me that the way to truly connect with the world and with others expands far beyond a two by five-inch screen. This, it seems to me, is perhaps the most widely acknowledged yet rarely practiced idea relating to our relationship with technology today. We all make jokes about walking around like zombies with our heads bent into our phones and as soon as the laughter stops we go right back to refreshing our Instagram pages every ten minutes looking for posts and connections to people that we barely even know beyond the realm of social media. And why? Because it has become a social construct that is engrained so deeply within us that it’s difficult to truly understand it as a type of addiction until we are forced from it by one thing or the other. For me, I was amazed by how many times I would be traveling through rural Paraguay or Bolivia and I would unlock my iPhone and stare at the screen or start to open Facebook, knowing full well that I didn’t have service or internet connection. My hands moved automatically out of habit and it took a frustratingly long time to decondition myself but, once I was able to, I felt an overwhelming sense of freedom and simplicity in being able to enjoy each moment without distractions. Read More »

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Triumphs and trials in the Islands

Time February 28th, 2017 in 2017 Spring, Chile | 1 Comment by

The transition from staying with my friend and her family to traveling on my own with a limited budget was a bit rough at first. But I have been glad to have my travel buddy with me to do all of the tourist activities that I missed out on in my first week in Cartagena. Not to mention he has successfully restored my confidence in my Spanish-speaking ability by comparison to his own. No longer able to rely on others to communicate for me, I have felt dually electrified and terrified by the challenge that traveling alone has posed and, more so, by the effect that is has had on me. Within a few days, I began to feel Spanish words and phrases coming to my mind with increasing speed and clarity. Within a week, I had my first dream in Spanish (Shakira took me shopping – it was awesome, she says that red is my color).

Our first day as tourists in Cartagena was spent on the beach in Boca Grande where I learned that laying in the equatorial sun at mid-day means multiple sun screen applications always. Later, we went downtown for a free walking tour of the oldest part of Cartagena. There are free walking tours offered in most every major city in South America and I strongly recommend them as the tour guides are extremely passionate about their cities. In Cartagena, free tours are offered in Spanish and English. We over confidently joined the Spanish group and ended up quietly slipping away to join the English one after five minutes of sheer confusion. As it turns out we don’t have much of a repertoire when it comes to Latin American history vocabulary. After two hours of learning about Colombian history and architecture, our guide ended the tour with an impassioned speech about his love for his country and how proud he is that Colombia’s international reputation is evolving from a country wrought with corruption and violence to a country of beautiful landscapes, rich culture and loving people. Read More »

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The Beginning

Time July 11th, 2016 in 2016 Fall, College Study Abroad | No Comments by

Hey there!

I’m Rachel, a girl who grew up in a tight-knit town in Oregon, USA, and moved to go to college in sunny Southern California. Now I’ll be traveling halfway across the globe to Wollongong, Australia, to study at the University of Wollongong just south of Sydney! Needless to say I’m excited beyond belief, but maybe I really have no idea what I’ll be getting myself into here by flying over 15 hours away from my home, but I think that’s most of the appeal of studying abroad. It’s the same as the day you walked into kindergarten, then high school, and especially into college: you have no idea who you’ll meet, what types of new situations you’ll end up in, and how much you will inevitably change in the end. Personally, I’m most excited about learning how to understand Australian slang and how their culture differs from America’s, as well as enjoying the beauty of the Australian coast and (hopefully!) exploring with some fellow students to as many cities as I can possibly fit into four months!

At my home University I study Environmental Business which is a balance of Environmental Science and Business Management, and am hoping to learn more about Australia’s laws about environmental responsibility on local, regional, and national scales while abroad! Also very, very interested in learning where the best bars are and what the best food is, so stay tuned to see some adventures involving my taste buds as well as my suit cases. Speaking of suitcases, packing is an adventure all in itself. I’m planning to travel as lightly as I can (HA), and can’t even count how many Pins I’ve saved about packing strategies, capsule wardrobes, and travel hacks. In the end, I know I’m not walking into the middle of the bush and can buy anything I forget once I arrive, and it’s a much better plan of action to pack less and save space for the souvenirs and items I’ll no doubt acquire while gone.

Am I excited? Undoubtedly. Am I nervous? Oh yeah. But I also realize that leaving on this trip will be an incredible step forward in my life that many people don’t have the opportunity to take, and I plan on appreciating every second that I’m abroad and soaking up the culture, friendships, and definitely the delicious foods I am lucky enough to experience (priorities on the food though, amiright?). As I prepare myself to leave, I feel like I’m saying “sayonara” to a small part of myself that still prioritizes staying in my comfort zone, and welcoming in some extra confidence to keep my head up and my heart open to whatever and whoever walks into my path.  Wish me luck as I finish up my packing and make the long trek out to Sydney, and I’m sure I’ll have plenty to share next time!

Cheers!

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Cheers! We’re in London

Time September 18th, 2013 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

Last time I blogged I was getting ready to depart for London..and now I’ve finally made it!

I have a really awful habit of not being able to sleep sitting up, so I was awake for over 24 hours last Tuesday.  My first flight from O’Hare to JFK was quite unadventurous, but my flight from JFK to Heathrow was quite different.  I arrived in terminal 3 at JFK and had to make my way to terminal 4 for the group flight.  If you’ve ever been to JFK before, please agree with me when I say it’s extremely confusing changing terminals.  Like most busy airports you have to take a train around, but at JFK you also have to go through security again.  This was quite hectic for me and made me a little irritated, however once I arrived at the right terminal I met so many college students, who were going to be in London with me.

We took a Virgin Atlantic flight, so we had our own personal TVs.  I watched the first 3 episodes of Nashville and  The Internship during the flight.  Regardless of my lack of sleep, I was entertained the entire time.  When we landed we were met by IFSA staff at baggage claim who directed us to a bus that took us to the St. Giles Hotel.

Unfortunately, the St. Giles does not have wifi, and it costs an arm and a leg to buy it, so many people were not able to contact their parents that they had made it safely.  The first stop for many people, including myself, was the phone store across the street.  Luckily, I have a Verizon iPhone 5, so I was able to get an international sim card with unlimited data and a certain number of texts and minutes.  Trust me when I say that apps like Viber will become your best friend for staying in contact with loved ones at home.   With my unlimited data I was able to call my parents and text my best friends.  If you don’t have an unlocked phone don’t worry, the phone store also sells pay as you go phones, which you can top up at basically any grocery store or drug store in London.

The information we received at orientation is kind of a blur for me now.  One thing that was preached to us was that British people are shyer than Americans.  This has been proven wrong by my flatmates, who are beyond friendly and love Americans.  Besides the information there are a couple of other interesting things that happened on orientation.

  1. You are placed with a roommate upon arriving at the hotel.  I would advise you not to change roommates even if you have a close friend on the program with you.  My roommate, Sydney, and I became friends fast and have been in contact ever since despite the fact she is studying abroad at University of Sussex.
  2. You meet so many people at orientation.  I met a great group of girls while I was there.  One of them even lives 20 minutes away from where I live in Illinois.  So don’t be afraid to go out of your box and hang out with people besides those who come from your home institution.
  3. IFSA gives you the option to attend a play on Thursday night.  Even if you don’t grasp the concept of British humour, go!  The play we went to was entitled Spamalot.  I haven’t seen Monty Python, but I found the play hilarious.  Another plus is that the bridge across from the theatre has incredible views of the city.
  4. On the last day there is a walking tour.  We didn’t get to see anything very touristy, but it was still fun seeing some famous sites.  My favorites were China Town, the place where Elton John composed “Your Song”, and the Australia House aka Gringotts in the Harry Potter films.
  5. IFSA allows you a lot of free time.  My friends and I took this as an opportunity to check out the various pubs in central London.  Each has its own “feel” to it.  My favorite was The Court, which is located on Tottenham Court (pronounced Tottnam).  It had great music, young people, and cool artwork in the ladies room.

All these pictures can be viewed below:

All in all, this past week has been filled with activities.  I’m still adjusting to the time zone, so I will update you with move in, Queen Mary, and my flatmates in my next post.

xx, Francesca

 

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