Student Blogs & Vlogs | College Study Abroad Programs, IFSA-Butler

Sprang Break Pt. 2– Cairo

Time April 16th, 2015 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

I GOT TO SEE THE PYRAMIDS AND RIDE A CAMEL AT THE SAME TIME!

This was one of the happiest moments of my life! It was something that when I was younger and learning all about the history of Egypt was something I thought would only be a dream. I smiled the whole time I was on-top of my camel, Jacques, and did not want to dismount after our ride. The Pyramids are overwhelming! Reading the dimensions is one thing, but standing next to them you realize what a feat constructing these monuments was. They are huge and something that if you have ever have the opportunity to see in person you must take, you will not be disappointed. The Sphinx is really cool too, but underwhelming. I was wanting it to be the size of a pyramid, but it is tiny when compared. But, still very cool and allowed me to get a great Instagram picture!

Getting to Cairo was long and stressful and I wasn’t even driving. Driving in Egypt like I said earlier about Alexandria is a whole world away from the U.S. and the UAE.

Another great monument we were able to visit was the Cairo Citadel, view the link for more information about the Citadel. Interesting fact, they chose the location by placing meat around the city and they chose the location where the meat rotted last. This how they knew the location had a fresh breeze. The Citadel is perched high above the city of Cairo and offers an amazing cityscape. It also contains the Mosque of Muhammad Ali. I was able to use my acquired knowledge from one of my classes, Arabic Architecture and Design, to describe the beautiful Ottoman mosque that was constructed. The mosque was designed by the same designer as the Blue Mosque in Istanbul and the similarities are very obvious. It is a beautiful structure in honor of Muhammad Ali and is now his resting place. Muhammad Ali is considered the founder of Modern Egypt, more information about him here.

I am now back in the UAE on campus and AUS. The trip to Egypt flew by and I am sad that it is already gone. There is so much in Egypt that I missed while I was there. I would love to visit The Valley of Kings, Luxor and enjoy the Nile. With that all being said, I hope one day to return and be able to enjoy the rest of Egypt.

Thanks again to IFSA-Butler, Dr. Mohamed El-Komi, Moataz, Mariam, and Kiri for putting together this amazing trip and providing airfare, travel and food. It was an amazing experience and I am forever grateful!

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Adventures in Tourist Land

Time September 15th, 2010 in College Study Abroad | No Comments by

So the last few days have been a lot of fun. We’ve been doing typical tourist stuff mostly.

We met Dr Al-Khomi’s son Sharif. Apparently he reads my blog and wanted to meet me (Shout out to Sharif!). He’s a nice kid. He offered to take us to ┬áCity Stars which is this absolutely massive mall. Rob, Trevor, Lauren and I went with Mr Memdu as chaperon/escort. The place us huge. I think around 10 stories. It has its own grocery store and multiple arcades. It was really not what I had expected of a mall in an Islamic country. There were a lot of women wearing the hijab, yes. But otherwise it was exactly like a western mall. There were a lot of the same shops and all the posters and advertisements were the same. I would have thought them to be scandalous over here! Girls in sensual poses or in revealing clothing (even by our standards in some places). There was even a “Women’s Secret” and while the mannequins and posters weren’t slutty models in tiny underoos, they were very clearly not wearing your grandmother’s underwear. Shocking.

We went bowling too and that was a ton of fun. I’m not a great bowler, but Egyptians suck. Even our chaperon Mr Memdu got in on the game a little bit. He’s a really fun guy for barely speaking any Ingelesia. (my blog is fun and educational!)

The next day was Pyramids day. That was incredible. We first went to Sakara to see the step pyramid – the oldest pyramid in Egypt and the first Egyptian pyramid (I think the temple at Uruk is the oldest one in the world. Sorry Egypt…). It was awesome. But there was trash everywhere and a lot of…. I’m not sure what to call them. This one guy came up to me dressed in phony Bedouin clothes and said “Where you from, American?! You want to take my picture?! Ride camel?!” and the whole time he was shaking my hand. These guys are all over historic sites. You take their picture, they want baksheesh which is like a few pounds tip. Or they’re hawking cheap goods. John (Gosh in Arabic.. there is no J sound) ended up buying a bunch of stuff. He bought a sun hat and it was vaguely cowboy in nature so they would yell “Hey Cowboy!” at him. They are relentless. At the White Mosque today they were pestering Simone and Corey pretty badly. The one guy kept following Simone, even after I moved between them and called her “Canada Dry.” Another guy offered Corey 200 goats. What exactly for we aren’t sure.

After that pyramid we visited a carpet weaving school. In Sakara they have a lot of these. Apparently they make the best carpets in the world. They have a lot of young kids working there. The tour guide for our group told us before we arrived (we had a guide for all of our tour of Cairo, so not the carpet guide..) that this is a good way for kids to help the family since they are very poor, they learn a trade, and it helps them pay for school if they go. The factory employed guide told us they only work 3 hours a day and they get a break every 15 minutes if they want it. It seems like a good thing. But on the other hand child labor seems a little shady. But who am I to judge? A starting salary for a police officer is about 150 pounds and I spent that much on art today. I can’t really speak out against a practice that might help feed a starving family.

The Giza pyramids were amazing, as expected. A stone block is almost as tall as I am. I got to climb it too! We were told we were allowed to climb to a specific point on the Pyramid and I didn’t see any stairs. So I just started climbing up blocks by heaving myself onto them – pretty gracefully if I do say so myself. But I got so high and a guard FREAKED OUT and started blowing on his whistle and gesturing for me to get down. I later learned there were stairs…

I rode a camel! The guide tried to take my hat. I took some video of that so I won’t talk too much about it except to say that he looked very good in my hat. The camel riding was a lot of fun. Better than horses in my opinion. Getting on and off is frightening because you sit almost completely vertical on the camel when his front legs kneel down. But the ride is much smoother, even at a gentle trot. They do smell though and I stank like camel the entire rest of the day. We visited the Sphyinx after that. It was neat but after the great pyramid.. what can compare?

Next day was much more shopping oriented. We visited the Citadel of Saladin and the White Mosque. The citadel was very disappointing. I was expecting this magnificient medieval crusader fortress and while it was neat from the outside.. inside was just stone walls. The White Mosque was much better. It reminded me a lot of pictures of Hagia Sophia or the Sulimaniye or the Blue Mosque. But a lot smaller and not as much light. After that we went to this place to “learn about ancient egyptian oils” which, is truthiness for “they’re going to give a sales pitch for perfume and aroma therapy then you will have a chance to buy some.”

It was a good pitch and I totally did. I bought one for myself and several for Amber. The proprieter told me “Hey I like this guy, he buy presents for his lady friend back home!” and a bunch of the girls thought I was being sweet and thoughtful. Trevor said “He’s just being a smart boyfriend.” They were insanely cheap and even though i spent a lot of money you would never find anything this cheap in the US. Its all organic too, and in the style that the ancient egyptians used, which means (according to the sales man and our tour guide/merchant baiter) they will last forever. As in they will never decay.

We went to the “papyrus museum” to learn about papyrus afterwards. We did learn how papyrus was made but we also got the “student discount” from the shop. I bought some stuff there too. I’m done buying souvenirs for a little while.

After that we visited the Khan al Khalil bazaar, the largest in the middle east second only to the one in Istanbul. We were told that while back in the day it had great stuff, now it’s a big tourist trap and most of it is made in China.

We head to Istanbul in a few days. Hopefully we’ll have better internet so I can upload all the video I have. I’ve taken maybe 20 minutes worth of short video clips.

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